Skip to main content design--angle-right
Upcoming modifications to the State Plan Schedule Learn more

This glossary is informational and serves as a quick reference to definitions and information pertaining to Title 1 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Please continue to refer to the current Training and Employment Guidance Letters (TEGLs) as any new information would supersede the information in the glossary

Last Updated: February 2018

ACCESS FOR ALL – An initiative within Oklahoma Works that places a focus on recruitment, hiring, and promotion of individuals with disabilities in the state of Oklahoma’s workforce. Access for All focuses on the Oklahoma Works partners as well as employers in the state. Access for All provides training, consulting, and resources to help all levels of Oklahoma Works to make sure that individual with disabilities are intentionally included in Oklahoma Works’ efforts to better household wealth for Oklahomans. Access for All equips Oklahoma’s Workforce System with knowledge and resources to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities that utilize Oklahoma Works programs in person, on the phone, or through the web. Access for All is a partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services and Oklahoma ABLE Tech, Oklahoma’s Assistive Technology Act Program.  Oklahoma ABLE Tech Access for All homepage http://www.ok.gov/abletech/Workforce_for_All/

ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVE – Describes measurable planned action (services and training) necessary to accomplish or assist in accomplishing a goal(s).

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE) – Adult Basic Education (ABE) would include upgrading basic skills and is directed towards adults who are generally classified as functionally illiterate, undereducated, or whose inability to speak, read, or write the English language constitutes a substantial impairment of the ability to get or retain employment commensurate with their real ability.  ABE is a Core (required) Partner in the Workforce System.  WIOA Title II.

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH TRAINING (NON-TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA)) – Adult education and literacy activities that lead to a secondary school diploma must be done concurrently or in coordination with one or more of the following training services (§ 680.350):

  • Occupational skills training
  • On-the-job training
  • Incumbent worker training
  • Programs that combined workplace training and related instruction, which may include cooperative education programs,
  • Training programs operated by the private sector,
  • Skill upgrading and retraining, or
  • Entrepreneurial training.

Adult Basic Education in Conjunction With Training(Youth program element 4) – A category of Occupational Skills Training for youth that provides basic skills upgrading and is directed towards those who are generally classified as functionally illiterate, undereducated, or whose inability to speak, read, or write the English language constitutes a substantial impairment of the ability to get or retain employment commensurate with their real ability concurrently with occupation training services.

ADULT – An individual who is age 18 or older.

ADULT MENTORING (Youth Program Element)The purpose of mentoring is to provide a participant with the opportunity to develop a positive relationship with an adult.  The adult mentor should provide a positive role model for educational, work skills, or personal or social development.  Mentoring for youth must be categorized as either:

  • Academic (primarily provided to assist youth in achieving academic success);
  • Employment-related (primarily provided to assist youth in achieving employment-related success); or
  • Personal or social development-related (primarily provided to assist youth in achieving personal and decision-making skills necessary to become successful members of communities and workplaces).

Adult Mentoring is one of the required 14 program elements and must be for the duration of at least twelve months, which may occur both during and after program participationMentoring can be a paid or unpaid activity.

NoteAdult mentors must be appropriately screened and trained (case managers and youth workers are not considered mentors for purposes of meeting the mentoring requirement).  Adult Mentoring services provided to youth participants must be appropriate to the needs of the individual youth as defined in their Individual Service Strategy and documented in enrollment notes.

ADULT MENTORING (Youth program element 8) – Element eight, adult mentoring, must last at least 12 months and may take place both during the program and following exit from the program and be a formal relationship between a youth participant and an adult mentor that includes structured activities where the mentor offers guidance, support, and encouragement to develop the competence and character of the mentee. The final rule also states that while group mentoring activities and mentoring through electronic means are allowable as part of the mentoring activities, at a minimum, the local youth program must match the youth with an individual mentor with whom the youth interacts on a face-to-face basis. Mentoring may include workplace mentoring where the local program matches a youth participant with an employer or employee of a company. Local programs should ensure appropriate processes are in place to adequately screen and select mentors.

ADVANCED TRAINING/OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS TRAINING– To count as a placement for the Youth Common Measures, advanced training constitutes an organized program of study that provides specific vocational skills that lead to proficiency in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at entry, intermediate, or advanced levels.  Such training should: (1) be outcome-oriented, and focused on a long-term goal as specified in the Individual Service Strategy; (2) be long-term in nature and commence upon program exit rather than being short-term training that is part of services received while enrolled in ETA-funded youth programs, and (3) result in attainment of a certificate.

AGE APPROPRIATE CAREER GOAL – The age appropriate goal determination shall include the selection of a single career goal or the identification of an initial career pathway of occupations to consider.  Either will be considered as an age-appropriate goal.

AGGREGATE – The total funds expended and/or accrued expenses for a program year.

ALLOCATION – The process of assigning a cost, or a group of costs, to one or more cost objective(s), in reasonable proportion to the benefit provided or other equitable relationship.

ALTERNATIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL SERVICES (Youth Program Element) Are specialized, structured curriculum offered inside or outside of the public school system which may provide work/study and/or General Educational Development (GED) preparation for students with behavior problems, physical/mental disabilities, who are at-risk of dropping out, who are institutionalized or adjudicated youth and/or youth who are in the legal custody of the Department of Youth Services and are residing in an institution.

ALTERNATIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL – A public school or publicly contracted educational program that serves youth who have not been successful in mainstream “traditional” academic programs and provides instruction leading to a high school diploma and/or GED.

NoteTo be classified as an “alternative school” or “alternative course of study” for WIOA purposes, a specialized structured curriculum is required which is clearly distinguishable from the regular curriculum offered to students in corresponding grades or classes.  Additionally, for WIOA purposes, an alternative school must be approved by the Local Educational Agency (LEA) before students may be reported as attending an alternative school.   The term “alternative school” should not be confused with “magnet schools” for specialized study or for accelerated studies or for contracted GED preparation.

ALTERNATIVE SECONDARY SCHOOL OFFERINGS OR DROPOUT PREVENTION (Youth program element 2) – Element two includes alternative secondary school services such as basic education skills training, individualized academic instruction, and English as a Second Language training, or those services that assist youth who have struggled in traditional secondary education. Dropout recovery services, such as credit recovery, counseling, and educational plan development, are those that assist youth who have dropped out of school. These services are provided with the goal of helping youth to re-engage and persist in education that leads to the completion of a recognized high school diploma equivalency.

Services aimed at getting a youth who has dropped out of secondary education back into a secondary school or alternative secondary school/high school equivalency program and preparing them for high school equivalency attainment, should be counted under program element 2.

APPLICANT STATEMENT (Self-Attestation) – An applicant statement is an attestation signed by the participant stating the information he/she submits to demonstrate eligibility for a WIOA program is true and accurate.  This would be used as outlined in state policy.  Attestation made by youth ages 18 and younger must be accompanied by the signature of a parent, guardian or other responsible adult.

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING – A program combining on-the-job training with related instruction that enables workers to master the practical and technical skills required for a skilled occupation.  An apprenticeship covers all aspects of the trade and includes both on-the-job training and related instruction.

APTITUDE – A natural or acquired talent or ability or quickness in learning and understanding.

ASSESSMENT – A review of educational skill levels, occupational skills, prior work experience, employability, interests, aptitudes and supportive service needs.  The goal is to accurately evaluate the customer in order to develop an appropriate service strategy to meet his or her individual needs.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY –  Assistive technology is defined in law as “product, device, or equipment, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that is used to maintain, increase, or improve the functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities”. Assistive technology may be very simple or it may be very complex in nature. Assistive technology may help an individual with a disability to perform activities related to life, work, or education independently.

Assistive technology can be anything from an assistive listening device, to a hand-held magnifier, to speech recognition software that allows an individual to use a computer with his or her voice.  Assistive technology is often used to help to ensure effective communication with individuals with disabilities. Assistive technology is also used to help individuals with disabilities perform activities related to training, school, or work independently.

ATTAINMENT OF A CERTIFICATE/DEGREE OR DIPLOMA – A credential, degree or certificate awarded in recognition of an individual’s measurable achievement in gaining the occupational, technical or educational skills necessary to gain employment or advance in an occupation.

ATTENDING ANY SCHOOL – Defined as an individual attending any High School or attending post-secondary education

AT-RISK OF DROPPING OUT OF SCHOOL – As determined by school district records, policies or personnel: a Youth who is experiencing a lack of academic success; a Youth who has a significant number of absences or erratic attendance, which result in the youth not benefiting from school; or a Youth who has behavior problems in the school setting.

AWARD – A contract, grant, sub-contract, sub-grant, or other type of legal instrument that conveys funds

BABEL NOTICE: a short notice included in a document or electronic medium (e.g. web site, application, ‘‘app’’ email) in multiple languages informing the reader that the communication contains vital information, and explaining how to access language services to have the contents of the communication provided in other languages (29 CFR Section 38.4(i)).

BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT– Conditions that may hinder an individual’s hiring, promotion or participation in the labor force.  Barriers may vary by location and labor market.  Some examples of barriers to employment are:

  • Deficient in basic literacy skills;
  • School Dropout;
  • Homelessness;
  • Runaway or Foster Care Youth;
  • Criminal Record;
  • An offender;
  • Pregnant or Parenting Youth;
  • Requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment (6th criteria for the youth program) as defined by the State.
  • Individual with a disability
  • Limited English speaker
  • Single parent
  • Older worker
  • Lack of work experience

BASIC EDUCATION – Instruction usually conducted in an institutional setting that is directed toward imparting the basic skills of communication, computation, problem solving, health, consumer development and citizenship.  Instruction for youth would include, but is not limited to, secondary school.  Such instruction is designed to raise the level of education of such individuals with a view to making them less likely to become dependent on others, to improving their ability to benefit from occupational skills training and  increasing their opportunities for more productive and profitable employment.

BASIC EMPLOYABILITY PLAN – Informal plan providing preliminary information about a participant’s employability based on an initial assessment of participant’s skills, interests, needs and work history. This plan is essential to determining the client’s next steps in the Workforce System.

BASIC LITERACY SKILLS – The term “basic skills” means basic education skills including reading comprehension, math computation, writing, speaking, listening, problem solving, reasoning and the capacity to use these skills.

BASIC SKILLS DEFICIENT –With respect to youth, has English reading, writing, or computing skills at or below the 8th grade level on a generally accepted standardized test or a comparable score on a criterion referenced test, or, is a youth or adult, that is unable to compute or solve problems, or read, write, or speak English, at a level necessary to function on the job, in the individual’s family, or in society.

BASIC SKILLS GOAL – A commitment to achieve a measurable increase to be considered as “at or below the 8th grade level.”  Basic education skills including reading comprehension, math computation, writing, speaking, listening, problem solving, reasoning and the capacity to use these skills.

BELOW GRADE LEVEL (Eligibility Barrier under the 5% exception)An individual with educational attainment that is one or more grade levels below the grade level appropriate to the age of the individual. When determining the level of deficiency for a youth participant, it is essential to determine the grade level at which they should be functioning.  In order to enter the first grade, a child must be six years old on or before September 1st.

Age on or before September 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Grade Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

BOARD ADMIN COSTS – Local Board personnel and non-personnel, direct and indirect cost that are associated with the administrative functions of WIOA. Examples: Accounting, budgeting, financial, and cash management functions. Payroll functions, personnel management functions, and development of systems and procedures required for administrative functions. Travel costs to carry out administrative activities or the overall management of the WIOA system.

BOARD PROGRAM COSTS – : Local Board personnel and non-personnel, direct and indirect cost that are associated with the programmatic functions of WIOA. Examples: Program personnel and related non personnel cost, tracking or monitoring of participant and performance information, performance and program cost information on eligible providers of training services, youth activities, and appropriate education activities

CAREER DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE (Youth Program Follow-up Element)Services provided during follow-up to assist a youth in making occupational or career decisions which include the provision of information, materials, suggestions, or advice.

CAREER GOAL(S) – The occupation or several related occupations selected by the participant and sanctioned by the Case Manager in which the participant wishes to receive related WIOA services and/or training.  The career goal(s) is established by using a self-directed career decision-making or job matching process that includes assessment instruments and occupational information to determine the best job match for training/services.  The career goal(s) is the bases for ISS development.

CAREER GUIDANCE – Services given to the job seeker that include the provision of information, materials, suggestions, or advice based on the job seeker’s needs which are intended to assist the job seeker in making occupational or career decisions.

CAREER GUIDANCE (Youth program element 13) – A category of element thirteen that provides career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services.

CAREER PATHWAYS – Career pathway programs are an approach to education, training, and workforce development that assure learners come away with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to succeed in in the workplace.  Career pathways include a clear sequence of employer-validated education coursework and lead to industry-validated certifications and credentials.

CAREER PLANNING – The provision of a client-centered approach in the delivery of services, designed to prepare and coordinate comprehensive employment plans, such as services strategies, for participants to ensure access to necessary workforce development activities and supportive services, using, where feasible, computer-based technologies; and to provide job, education, and career counseling, as appropriate during program participation and after job placement.

CAREER TECH – The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, also known as Career Tech, offers organized educational programs which consist of sequences of courses directly related to preparing individuals for paid or unpaid employment in current or emerging oc­cupations requiring other than a baccalaureate or advanced degree (Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, Public Law 105-332).  A combined partner in the Oklahoma Workforce System.

CAREER SERVICES – The law combines core and intensive services into a new category called “career services.” This change gives staff in the One-Stop centers the flexibility to provide access to training based on assessed need.

CARL PERKINS- Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education is a combined partner in the Oklahoma Workforce System.

CASELOAD – A group of enrolled participants who receive primary assistance from a specific case manager in order to participant in program activity.

CASE MANAGEMENT – The facilitation and coordination of services to provide individuals with specific resources to take control of their life.  Case management requires the case manager to focus on the long and short term goals an individual has and empower them to made educated decisions about their future.  Case management is comprehensive and uses a participant focused approach in the delivery of services designed:

  • To prepare and coordinate comprehensive employment plans, such as service strategies, for participants to ensure access to necessary workforce investment activities and supportive services, using, where feasible, computer-based technologies; and
  • To provide job and career counseling during program participation and after job placement.

CERTIFICATE – A certificate is awarded in recognition of an individual’s attainment of measurable technical or occupational skills necessary to gain employment or advance within an occupation.  These technical or occupational skills are based on standards developed or endorsed by employers.  Certificates awarded by workforce development boards are not included in this definition.  Work readiness certificates are also not included in this definition. (Common Measures Definition) A certificate is awarded in recognition of an individual’s attainment of technical or occupational skills by:

  • A state educational agency or a state agency responsible for administering vocational and technical education within a state;
  • An institution of higher education described in Section 102 of the Higher Education Act (20 USC 1002) that is qualified to participate in the student financial assistance programs authorized by Title IV of that Act. This includes community colleges, proprietary schools, and all other institutions of higher education that are eligible to participate in federal student financial aid programs;
  • A professional, industry, or employer organization (e.g., National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence certification, National Institute for Metalworking Skills, Inc., Machining Level I credential) or a product manufacturer or developer (e.g., Microsoft Certified Database Administrator, Certified Novell Engineer, Sun Certified Java Programmer) using a valid and reliable assessment of an individual’s knowledge, skills, and abilities;
  • A registered apprenticeship program;
  • A public regulatory agency, upon an individual’s fulfillment of educational, work experience, or skill requirements that are legally necessary for an individual to use an occupational or professional title or to practice an occupation or profession (e.g., FAA aviation mechanic certification, state certified asbestos inspector);
  • A program that has been approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs to offer education benefits to veterans and other eligible persons;
  • Job Corps centers that issue certificates;
  • Institutions of higher education which is formally controlled, or has been formally sanctioned, or chartered, by the governing body of an Indian tribe or tribes.

CHIEF LOCAL ELECTED OFFICIAL (CLEO) – The elected officer of a unit of general government in a local workforce development area.

CHILD CARE / DEPENDENT CARE ASSISTANCE – A supportive service that provides assistance with child/dependent care costs necessary to enable individuals to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.

CHILD OF INCARCERATED PARENT(S) – A youth whose parent or parents are currently incarcerated and who requires assistance in overcoming artificial barriers to employment. (Sixth Barrier Characteristic for the Youth program)

CITIZENSHIP / ELIGIBLE TO WORK – Participation in programs and activities financially assisted in who or part under WIOA shall be open to citizens and nationals of the United States, lawfully admitted permanent resident aliens, lawfully admitted refugees and parolees, and other individuals authorized by the United States.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES – (Youth Leadership Development Element) Activities that encourage responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors.

COLLABORATION – A mutually beneficial alliance of groups or organizations that come together to achieve common goals for youth in their sub-region.  This alliance is characterized by well-defined relationships that include a commitment to:

  • Mutual relationships and goals;
  • Jointly developed structured and shared responsibility in delivering 14 Youth Program Elements in their sub-region;
  • Sharing of resources; and
  • Mutual authority and accountability for success.

COMMON MEASURES FOR WIOA ADULT PROGRAMS

  • Entered Employment – The number of adult participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the 2nd quarter after the exit quarter.
  • Employment Retention – The number of participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the 4th quarter after the exit quarter.
  • Median Earnings – The median earning or participants who are in unsubsidized employment in the second quarter after exit.
  • Credential Rate – The percentage of participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary or secondary diploma (or its equivalent) during participation of within 1 year after exit.
  • Skill Gains – The percentage of participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measureable skill gains toward such a credential or employment. 

 COMMON MEASURES FOR YOUTH

  • Placement Rate – the percentage of program participants who are in education, training activities or in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit.
  • Retention Rate – The percentage of program participants who are in education, training activities or unsubsidized employment during the 4th quarter after exit from the program.
  • Median Earnings – The median earnings in the second quarter after exit.
  • Credential Rate – The percentage of participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary, secondary diploma or its equivalent during participation of within 1 year after exit.
  • Skill Gains – The percentage of participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measureable skill gains toward such a credential or employment.

COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION – A private nonprofit organization that is representative of a community or a significant segment of a community and that has demonstrated expertise and effectiveness in the field of workforce investment.

COMMUNITY and SERVICE LEARNING PROJECTS(Youth Program Leadership Development Element)  Structured workplace or community-based learning experience, through which participants learn and develop by participating in organized community service work activities designed to meet identified community needs. Community and Service Learning Projects are designed collaboratively by the program and participant(s) to further understanding of course content, acquire a broader appreciation of the discipline, enrich the learning experience, and promote a lifelong civic engagement and enhanced sense of civic responsibility.

COMPLAINT: An allegation of a violation of the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions.

COMPLAINANT: any participant or other personally interested or personally affected party, group, or agency alleging a non-criminal violation of the requirements of WIOA Title I or a related agreement or service.

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT/OBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT – A comprehensive assessment is a detailed examination that identifies service needs, academic levels, goals, interests, skill levels, abilities, aptitudes, and supportive service needs, and measures barriers and strengths. It includes a review of basic and occupational skills, prior work experience, employability potential, interests, aptitudes, supportive service needs and developmental needs. The assessment results in an individual employment plan (IEP) for Adult programs or and individual service strategy (ISS) for Youth programs.

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDANCE & COUNSELING (Youth Program Element) Is primarily provided to assist a youth in achieving success in school and at the workplace.  Assistance may include drug & alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth.  Services may be provided on an individual or group basis, using a variety of processes and techniques.  Counseling is on-going and interactive and may be a key ingredient for a successful outcome.

NoteComprehensive guidance and counseling, drug & alcohol abuse counseling, and referral to counseling must be provided by an appropriately trained and credentialed/licensed counselor

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING – (Youth program element 10) – Element ten includes comprehensive guidance and counseling that provides individualized counseling to participants. This includes drug and alcohol abuse counseling, mental health counseling, and referral to partner programs, as appropriate.

CONCURRENT EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND & WORKFORCE PREPARATION (Youth program element 5) – Element five reflects an integrated education and training model and describes how workforce preparation activities, basic academic skills, and hands-on occupational skills training are to be taught within the same time frame and connected to training in a specific occupation, occupational cluster, or career pathway. While programs developing basic academic skills, which are included as part of alternative secondary school services and dropout recovery services (program element 2), workforce preparation activities that occur as part of a work experience (program element 3), and occupational skills training (program element 4) can all occur separately and at different times (and thus are counted under separate program elements), this program element refers to the concurrent delivery of these services which make up an integrated education and training model.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST – A term used to describe the situation in which a public official or fiduciary who, contrary to the obligation and absolute duty to act for the benefit of the public or a designated individual, exploits the relationship for personal benefit, typically pecuniary.

CONTRACT – Legal instrument by which an entity purchases property or services needed to carry out the project or program under a Federal award.

CONTRACTOR – An entity responsible for providing generally required goods or services.  These goods or services may be for the sub-recipients’ own use or for the use of participants in the programs.  Distinguishing characteristics of a vendor contractor include items such as:  providing goods and services within normal business operation; providing similar goods or services to too many different purchasers; and operating in a competitive environment.  A vendor contractor is not a sub-recipient and does not exhibit the distinguishing characteristics attributable to a sub-recipient as defined above.

COORDINATION OF TRAINING FUNDS (COTF) – The coordination of training funds is required to provide documentation of the coordination between WIOA funding and another funding sources.  This is documented on a form that is completed by the training institution’s financial aid office or other authorized representative and should include the cost of allowable training expenses in addition to an estimate of the cost of living for the time frame outlined.

CORE PROGRAMS – Programs that are authorized by WIOA to be part of the one-stop career center (also known as the American Job Center):

  • WIOA Title 1 Adult, Dislocated Worker and Youth formula programs administered by the Department of Labor;
  • Adult Education and Literacy Act programs administered by the Department of Career and Technology Education, also known as Career Tech;
  • Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Services administered by the Department of Labor;
  • Rehabilitation Act Title1 programs.

CORROBORATIVE WITNESS: An individual who personally knows or can identify the WIOA job seeker and who is reasonably likely to be able to verify the self-certification. Such verification may be accomplished by the witness signing the applicant statement form or by completion of a telephone/document inspection form.

COST ANALYSIS: Is the element-by-element examination of the estimated or actual cost of contract performance to determine the probable cost to the contractor.

COURT INVOLVED YOUTH – Any youth 14-24 who has committed status offenses or delinquent acts and is or has been a participant in the Department of Juvenile Justice System.

COVERED PERSONA covered person is a veteran or an eligible spouse of a veteran.  A veteran is a person who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable, as specified in 38 U.S.C. 101(2). Active service includes full-time Federal service in the National Guard or a Reserve component.  Active service does not include full-time duty performed strictly for training purposes (often referred to as “weekend” or “annual” training), nor does it include full-time active duty performed by National Guard personnel who are mobilized by State rather than Federal authorities. (State mobilizations usually occur in response to events such as natural disasters.)  An eligible spouse is the spouse of any of the following:

  • Any veteran who died of a service-connected disability;
  • Any member of the Armed Forces serving on active duty who, at the time of application for the priority, is listed in one or more of the following categories and has been so listed for a total of more than 90 days: (i) Missing in action; (ii) Captured in line of duty by a hostile force; or (iii)Forcibly detained or interned in line of duty by a foreign government or power;
  • Any veteran who has total disability resulting from a service-connected disability, as evaluated by the Department of Veterans Affairs; or
  • Any veteran who died while a disability, as indicated in previous bullet of this section, was in existence.

CREDENTIAL – A nationally recognized degree or certificate or state/locally recognized credential.  Credentials include, but are not limited to, a high school diploma, GED, or other recognized equivalents, post-secondary degrees/certificates, recognized skill standards, and licensure or other industry-recognized certificates including all state education agencies’ recognized credentials.

CRT OCCUPATIONAL – Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Only – Classroom occupational training.

CUSTOMIZED LABOR MARKET INFORMATION – Customized information provided to an individual client on: state and local labor market conditions; industries, occupations and characteristics of the workforce; area business identified skills needs; employer wage and benefit trends; short and long term industry and occupational projections; worker supply and demand; and job vacancies survey results. Workforce information also includes local employment dynamics information such as workforce availability; business turnover rates; job creation; and job identification of high growth and high demand industries.

CUSTOMIZED RESUME ASSISTANCE – A service that provides assistance with the development of customized resumes (beyond the OJL resume) and cover letters suitable for review by employers.

CUSTOMIZED TRAINING – A training service that must meet the following criteria:

A.) Designed to meet the special requirements of an employer (including a group of employers);

B.) Conducted with a commitment by the employer to employ, or in the case of incumbent workers, continue to employ, an individual upon successful completion of the training; and

C.) For which the employer pays for at least 10 and up to 50 percent of the cost of training.

Customized training of eligible employed individual may be provided for an employer (or a group of employers) when:

  • The employee is not earning a self-sufficient wag as determined by Local Board policy;
  • The requirements in (a) – (c) above are met; and
  • The customized training relates to the introduction of new technologies, introduction to new production or service procedures, upgrading to new jobs that require additional skills, workplace literacy, or other appropriate purposes identified by the Local Board.

CUSTOMIZED TRAINING – (Youth program element 4) – A category of Occupation Skills Training for youth that is designed to meet the special requirements of an employer, conducted with a commitment by the employer to employ the individual upon successful completion of the training, and for which the employer pays for a significant cost of the training.

 

DATA VALIDATION – The process of checking individual data fields to ensure the data submitted to the United States Department of Labor is accurate and conforms to the required specifications.  Data Validation is conducted once a year after the filing of the WIOA annual report.

DATE OF ENROLLMENT / PARTICIPATION – The first day, following a determination of eligibility, that the individual receives a service funded by the program.  This date is established by a staff person entering the enrollment and subsequent service into the virtual case management system.  The Date of Enrollment must equal the date of the first program service.

DATE OF EXIT – The term program exit means a participant has not received a service funded by the program or by a partner program for 90 consecutive calendar days, and is not scheduled for future services. The exit date is the last date of service.

DEFICIENT IN BASIC LITERACY SKILLS (Eligibility Barrier) – The term “deficient in basic literacy skills” is defined as:

  • Computes or solves problems, reads, writes, or speaks English at or below the 8th (8.9 or below) grade level on a generally accepted standardized test or a comparable score on a criterion referenced test; or
  • Is unable to compute or solve problems, read, write, or speak English at a level necessary to function on the job, in the individual’s family or in society.

Note:  Grade level scores below 9.0 (e.g., 8.9) should be considered as “at or below the 8th grade level.”

DEMAND OCCUPATION – A demand occupation is one in which substantial numbers of employment opportunities exist within the local area.  Demand occupations may also include occupations that are considered to be emerging.

DEMOGRAPHIC – An individual program eligibility descriptor or statistic.

DEMOGRAPHIC SNAPSHOT – Non-editable information or data taken from a participant at the time of program enrollment.  The snapshot is used to show the characteristics of the individual that were used to determine eligibility for services.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE – A department of the government of Oklahoma.  The Department is the primary economic development entity in the state with the mission of creating and delivering high-impact solutions that lead to prosperous lives and communities for all Oklahomans.  The Department of Commerce is a Combined Partner in the Oklahoma Workforce System.

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES – A department of the government of Oklahoma.  The department manages public assistance and human services programs that help individuals and families in need to help themselves lead safer, healthier more independent lives.  The Department of Human Services is the largest agency in Oklahoma. The Department of Human Services is a Combined Partner in the Oklahoma Workforce System.

DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS – Items, materials, situations, steps or acts that need to occur to aid in the growth of an individual or to assist an individual to realize or meet his or her potential.

DIRECT PARTICIPANT TRAINING – Tuition or instruction payments for participants. Examples: Individual Training Accounts (ITA’s), On-the-Job Training (OJT), or contracted services for customized training.

DISABILITY – There is not a single definition of disability that applies across the board.  Instead, there are varied definitions that are used when determining eligibility for different programs or benefits, or when determining if an individual is protected under a law such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Definition of “disability” under the Americans with Disabilities Act:

Under the ADA, the term “disability” means, with respect to an individual

(A) A physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual;

(B) A record of such an impairment; or

(C) Being regarded as having such an impairment.

For purposes of this definition, ”major life activities” include, but are not limited to, caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.  A “major life activity” also includes the operation of a major bodily function, including but not limited to, functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions.

An individual meets the requirement of “being regarded as having such an impairment” if the individual establishes that he or she has been subjected to an action prohibited under the ADA because of an actual or perceived physical or mental impairment, whether or not the impairment limits or is perceived to limit a major life activity.  This prong of the definition does not apply when the impairment or perceived impairment is transitory and minor.  A transitory impairment is an impairment with an actual or expected duration of 6 months or less.

42 U.S.C. Chapter 126, Section 12102.

For more information on the ADA and how it applies to business, government agencies, employers and individuals with disabilities, go to www.ada.gov. Select the Technical Assistance tab to find many online publications highlighting various aspects of the ADA and its requirements.

Definition of an “individual with a disability” for purposes of eligibility for Vocational Rehabilitation services:

The term “disability” means a physical or mental impairment that constitutes or results in a substantial impediment to employment.

29 U.S.C. Chapter 16, Section 705 (9).

The term “individual with a disability” means any individual who has a physical or mental impairment which for such individual constitutes or results in a substantial impediment to employment; and who can benefit in terms of an employment outcome from vocational rehabilitation services.

29 U.S.C. Chapter 16, Section 705 (20) (A).

DISALLOWED COSTS – Charges to a Federal award that the Federal awarding or pass-through entity determines to be unallowable, in accordance with the applicable Federal statues, regulations, or the terms and conditions of the Federal award.

DISBURSEMENT-The transfer of cash from the grantee to a sub grantee or other payee, either by check, voucher or an electronic transfer issued to the entity often through an electronic payment system.

DISCONNECTED YOUTH – Generally defined as a young person between the ages of 16 and 24 that lacks a high school diploma and is not enrolled in school and is detached from work.  Disconnected youth are often without hope, dreams and trust and face a likelihood of increased interactions with the juvenile and criminal justice systems.

DISLOCATED WORKER:  Is defined as an individual who is unemployed through no fault of his or her own or who has received an official layoff notice. The job seeker my fall into one of three categories:

Category 1

  • Has been terminated, laid off, or received a notice of termination or layoff from employment; is eligible for or has exhausted entitlement to unemployment compensation;

Or

  • Has been employed for a duration sufficient to demonstrate attachment to the workforce, but is not eligible for unemployment compensation due to insufficient earnings or having performed services for an employer that were not covered under a state unemployment compensation law;

And

  • Is unlikely to return to a previous industry or occupation.

Category 2

  • Has been terminated, laid off, or has received a notice of termination or layoff from employment as a result of any permanent closure of, or any substantial layoff at a plant,  facility, or enterprise;
  • Is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such that such facility will close within 180 days;

Or

  • Is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close;

Or

  • For purposes of eligibility to receive services other than training services, is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close.

Category 3

  • Was self-employed (including employment as a farmer, a rancher, or a fisherman) but is unemployed as a result of general economic conditions in the community in which the individual resides or because of natural disasters;

Or

  • Is a displaced homemaker.

Note:   If they meet the eligibility requirements, non-retiree military service members discharged other than dishonorably and qualifying military spouses may be eligible to be served as dislocated workers.

DISPLACED HOMEMAKER: A job seeker who has been providing unpaid services to family members in the home, and who:

  • Has been dependent on the income of another family member but is no longer supported by that income; and
  • Is unemployed or underemployed and is experiencing difficulty in obtaining or upgrading employment.

Note: For purposes of (B) above, underemployment occurs when an individual is working part time but desires full-time employment or is working in employment not commensurate with the individual’s demonstrated level of educational attainment—e.g., a college graduate in microbiology can find no work in his or her field and is working as a clerk in a department store. [DOL Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) 14-00, Change 1]

DOCUMENTATION – Physical evidence, which is obtained during the verification process, is maintained in participant files.  Such evidence includes, but is not limited to, documents verifying date of birth, registration with selective service, inspection forms or a signed self-certification.

DROP OUT PREVENTION STRATEGIES – Student centered intensive individualized attention and instruction through tutoring, mentoring programs, alternative secondary school offerings, and instruction technologies to assist youth with the completion of high school.   Effective programs also characteristically feature a wide range of student assistance services to address such things as substance abuse, teen pregnancy and young parenthood, suicide prevention, and other mental and physical health issues.

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED – An individual with diminished capital and credit opportunities due to income below the poverty level is economically disadvantaged.  Individuals receiving benefits from a federal, state or local welfare program, Supplemental Nutrition Program (SNAP) assistance (also known as food stamps), Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), or who are homeless, a foster child, or who fall below 70% of the Lower Living Standard Income Levels (LLSIL) are considered economically disadvantaged.

ECOSYSTEM – A collection of industries that produce or provide similar goods or services and therefore also have similar needs in workforce, infrastructure and economic development policy.

EDUCATIONAL FUNCTIONING LEVELS – As outlined in the National Reporting System (NRS) designed by the Department of Education to track adult education and literacy programs – there are two sets of educational functioning levels – six levels for Adult Basic Education (ABE) and six levels for English-as-a second language (ESL) students.  The ABE levels roughly equate to two grade levels.  Each ABE and ESL level describes a set of skills and competencies that students entering demonstrate in the areas of reading, writing, numeracy, speaking, listening, functional, and workplace skills.  These descriptors provide guidelines for placing participants in educational functioning levels, based on performance on standardized tests.

EEOC – The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is a federal agency that administers and enforces civil rights laws against workplace discrimination.  The EEOC investigates discrimination complaints based on an individual’s race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age disability, genetic information, and retaliation for reporting, participating in, and/or opposing a discriminatory practice.

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION – Communication is central to participation in educational and work environments, and is critical to making sure that job seekers can take full advantage of the programs offered under Oklahoma Works. Effective Communication is a concept that is central to the Americans with Disabilities Act and other laws put in place to protect the civil rights of individuals with disabilities.

At its core, effective communication refers to the need to ensure that companies, agencies, and organizations take appropriate steps to communicate as clearly with individuals with disabilities as they communicate with individuals without disabilities. In many cases, communication with individuals with disabilities is effective when done without the use of any assistive technology or adjustments to the means of communication. But for many other individuals with disabilities the form of communication may have to change in order to make sure that the communication works.

More complex or lengthy communication exchanges require that more thought is given to making sure that the communication is effective. For example, a job seeker that cannot see well may need printed materials that are magnified so that he or she can read them. A job seeker that is deaf or hard of hearing may need a speech amplification device so that he or she can hear instructions or training. There are many tools available to help to ensure effective communication, and it is important for Oklahoma Works partners to account for different methods of communicating with job throughout the state.

Effective Communication from ADA.gov is found at http://www.ada.gov/effective-comm.htm

ELIGIBILITY DETERMINATION – Individuals receiving services as a WIOA youth must meet the ISY or OSY eligibility criteria and provide documentation set forth in guidance.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH – The WIOA Youth Program puts emphasis on out-of-school youth (OSY) between the ages of 16-24.  In addition to not attending any school (as defined by state law, Oklahoma Code, Title 70-1-106) eligibility for the WIOA OSY program requires the youth to fall into one of the following categories:

  • Individual with a disability;
  • School dropout;
  • Not attended school for at least the most recent complete school year calendar quarter;
  • A high school graduate who is low income* and either an English language learner or basic skills deficient;
  • An offender (juvenile who is or has been subject to any stage of the criminal justice process);
  • A homeless youth or a runaway youth;
  • In foster care or has aged out of foster care;
  • Pregnant or parenting;
  • An individual who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment is defined by the state as an individual who is low income* and meets at least one of the following criteria:
  • With a parent or legal guardian that is currently or previously incarcerated for a felony conviction
  • With a parent or legal guardian who lacks a high school diploma or GED; or
  • Who attends or has attended chronically under performing schools listed as a Targeted Intervention School on the State Department of Education website http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Targeted%20Intervention5.5.15.pdf, or a school listed a Focus Designation School on the State Department of Education website: http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Focus%20original%202014.pdf.

*The low income requirement applies to the OSY 4th and 9th categories only.  The term low-income also includes a youth that lives in a high-poverty area.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN-SCHOOL YOUTH – In-School-Youth (ISY) must be attending school, not younger than 14 or older than 21. Note: Youth who are home schooled or virtual leaners are ISY.   Youth eligible to be served as ISY must be low income* and fall into one or more of the following categories:

  • Basic skills deficient;
  • An English language learner;
  • An offender (juvenile who is or has been subject to any stage of the criminal justice process);
  • A homeless youth or a runaway youth;
  • In foster care or has aged out of foster care;
  • Pregnant or parenting;
  • Individual with a disability;
  • An individual who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment is an individual who is low income* and meets at least one of the following criteria:
  • With a parent or legal guardian that is currently or previously incarcerated for a felony conviction;
  • With a parent or legal guardian who lacks a high school diploma or GED; or
  • Who attends or has attended chronically under performing schools listed as a Targeted Intervention School on the State Department of Education website http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Targeted%20Intervention5.5.15.pdf, or a school listed a Focus Designation School on the State Department of Education website http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Focus%20original%202014.pdf.

*The term low-income also includes a youth that lives in a high-poverty area.

There is a 5% window for non-income eligible ISY only.  5% percent of the total number of ISY served may be non-income eligible as long as they meet other eligibility criteria.  The 5% window does not apply to OSY.

ELIGIBLE PROVIDER – The term “eligible provider”, used with respect to:

  • Training services, means a provider who is identified in accordance with WIOA;
  • Youth activities, means a provider who is awarded a grant or contract in accordance with WIOA  (a competitive process); or
  • Other workforce investment activities, means a public or private entity selected to be responsible for such activities, such as a designated or certified one-stop operator.

ELIGIBLE TRAINING PROVIDER LIST (ETPL) – A list of providers and their training programs and/or services that meet specific criteria and requirements to qualify for WIOA funding.  The list is designed to assist individuals receiving WIOA services in finding approved training programs.  Use of the ETPL is required when funding is paid with WIOA dollars through an Individual Training Account (ITA).

ELIGIBLE FOR UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE (UI): Includes any job seeker, at time of application, whose wages from employment would be considered in determining eligibility for unemployment compensation under federal or state unemployment compensation laws.

  • Anyone dislocated from UI-covered employment, even if employed for only a single day, may be considered eligible for UI benefits.
  • Former members of the armed forces may be eligible for Unemployment Compensation for Ex-military Personnel (UCX). UCX may be considered as a form of unemployment compensation for the purpose of determining eligibility for dislocated worker services. However, not all individuals eligible for UCX will meet the terminated or laid off criterion.
  • The Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) program is administered by the state employment agency under agreements with the Secretary of L States are required to pay benefits to unemployed federal workers in the same amount and under the same conditions payable if the worker were covered under the applicable state UI law. State UI law provisions that apply to state-covered workers also apply to individuals filing under UCFE. Civilian employees of federal agencies and instrumentalities of the U.S. who are not specifically excluded by federal law are eligible for services under UCFE. Texas Workforce Commission (Commission) confirmation of those services, which are or are not considered UI-covered employment, may be necessary.
  • Any dislocated worker determined eligible to receive unemployment compensation under the Railroad Retirement Act (railroad employees) may be considered to be eligible for UI.

ELIGIBLE TO WORK: Participation in programs and activities financially assisted by WIOA “shall be available to citizens and nationals of the United States, lawfully admitted permanent resident aliens, refugees, parolees, and other immigrants authorized by the Attorney General to work in the United States.” Citizens and nationals must prove citizenship with documentation of place of birth or citizenship status.

Permanent resident and temporary resident aliens (eligible noncitizens) must prove citizenship status with an alien registration receipt card issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). This card is a photo ID. IDs issued prior to July 1, 1979, will be a Form 1-151 (green card). Subsequent IDs will be a Form 1-551 (white card). All permanent resident aliens are authorized to work.

Lawfully admitted refugees, parolees, and other individuals must prove authorized employment status with an annual-departure record issued by the INS. If an individual is permitted to work in the U.S., the individual’s card will be stamped Employment Authorized.

EMERGENCY OR SHORT TERM HOUSING ASSISTANCE – A supportive service which provides assistance with housing that is necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.

EMPLOYABILITY – A demonstrated level of knowledge, skills, abilities, work behaviors and attitudes necessary to compete successfully in the labor market.

EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION ASSISTANCE – Assistance in the employment application process, which may include filling out an application, preparing for an interview, appropriate dress for interview, etc.

EMPLOYMENT GOAL/OBJECTIVE – Goals for future employment which may be set after an assessment of skills, an interest inventory, and strategic consideration of training needs.

EMPLOYED –  An employed individual is currently working as a paid employee or who works in his or her own business or profession or on his or her own farm, or works 15 hours or more per week as an unpaid worker in a farm or enterprise operated by a member of the family, or is one who is not working, but has a job or business from which he or she was temporarily absent because of illness, bad weather, vacation, labor-management dispute, or personal reasons, whether or not paid by the employer for time-off, and whether or not seeking another job.

EMPLOYMENT-RELATED TRAINING: training that allows or enables an individual to obtain skills, abilities and/or knowledge that are designed to lead to employment.

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ACQUISITION SERVICES – Services designed to help individuals who are English language learners achieve competence in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension of the English language that leads to the attainment of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and allows the participant to transition to postsecondary education, training or employment.  Adult education and literacy classes are provided through the Oklahoma Department of Career and technology Education (ODCTE), while the Oklahoma Department of Libraries (ODL) provide literacy programs through libraries, non-profits, and other organizations across the state.  Adult education and literacy activities may only be WIOA-funded when such services are not available through ODCTE, ODL programs, or local community based organizations.

ENTERED TRAINING RELATED EMPLOYMENT – Upon entering employment, it must be determined whether or not each individual that received training paid for with WIOA funds entered employment that was related to the training they received or at least utilizes a substantial portion of the skills obtained by the individual during the training they received.

ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS TRAINING – Training designed to develop skills associated with entrepreneurship, including the ability to take initiative, creatively seek out and identify business opportunities, develop budgets and forecast resource needs, understand various options for acquiring capital and the trade-offs associated with each option, and communicate effectively and market oneself and one’s ideas.

ENTREPRENEURIAL TRAINING (Youth program element 12) – Element twelve provides that basics of starting and operating a small business. Such training much develop the skills associated with entrepreneurship such as take initiative, creatively seeking out and identifying business opportunities, developing budges and forecasting resource needs, etc.

EQUIPMENT – Tangible property (including information technology systems) having useful life of more than one year and a per-unit acquisition cost which equals or exceeds the lesser of the capitalization level established by the non–Federal entity for financial statement purposes, or $5,000.00.

ETP INFORMATION SERVICES – Providing information and instruction on the Eligible Training Provider List.

EXPENDITURES – Charges made by a non-Federal entity to a project or program for which a Federal award was given.

EXIT/EXITER – An exit occurs when a participant does not received a service funded by the program or a partner program for 90 consecutive calendar days and is not scheduled for future services.  The date of exit is applied retroactively to the last day on which the participant received a service.

EXPOSURE TO POST-SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES (Youth Program Leadership Development Opportunity Element) – Exposure to post-secondary education can be accomplished through tours and by explaining the opportunities available through, (i.e.):

  • Colleges
  • Technical Schools
  • Career Pathways Exploration
  • Financial Aid Opportunities
  • org

FAITH BASED ORGANIZATION – A term often used to refer to religious organizations and other charitable organizations affiliated or identified with one or more religious organizations.

FAMILY –The term “family” means two or more persons related by blood, marriage, or decree of court, who are living in a single residence, and are included in one or more of the following categories:

  • A husband, wife, and dependent children;
  • A parent or guardian and dependent children;
  • A husband and wife.

NOTE: Training and Employment Letter (TEGL) 26-13 states “Consistent with the Supreme Court’s Windsor decision and the ETA’s policy of treating all individuals equally, regardless of sexual orientation, ETA interprets gender specific terms of marriage, such as “widow, “ “widower,” “husband,” and “wife,” to include married same-sex spouses

Any individual not meeting the above definition of family is considered to be a family of one.

The State is providing the following clarifications to the definition of family:

  • “Guardian” refers to an individual related by blood, marriage, or decree of court and/or living in a single residence where the parents are not present in the residence.
  • The phrase “living in a single residence” includes temporary, voluntary residence elsewhere such as attending school or college, or visiting relatives. It does not include involuntary temporary residence elsewhere, such as incarceration or placement into foster care as result of a court order.
    • Dependent Youth– Includes those children under the age of 18 or any youth attending secondary school, regardless of age, living with parent(s)/guardian or other responsible adult unless they have children of their own or are legally married.

FAMILY INCOME – All income received by all members of the family during the six-month period prior to application/registration, annualized by multiplying the six-month income by two (6-month income x 2). This amount should be compared to the 70% LLSIL or HHS poverty determination, whichever is greater.  The composition of the family is determined as of the date of the application/registration. Therefore, the income of prior family members who may have comprised part of the family during the past six months, but are no longer members of the household (i.e., a divorced, separated or deceased spouse, or other family member) would not be counted for income determination purposes. Only the income of members of the current family should be counted and applied against the current family size.

Inclusions to Family Income

  • Gross wages and salaries before deductions: Total money earnings received from work performed as an employee. If a family’s only source of income was from wages and salary payments, family income would be equal to gross wages and salary received.
  • Income from non-farm self-employment: Net income (gross income minus operating expenses) from a business or other non-farm enterprise in which a person is engaged on his/her own account. If the business or enterprise has suffered a loss, this loss will be allowed to offset wage earnings.
  • Income from farm self-employment: Net income from farm self-employment (income from a farm which operates as an owner, renter, or sharecropper, after deductions for farm operating expenses). If the farm has suffered a loss, this loss will be allowed to offset wage earnings. Money received under the Agricultural Crop Stabilization Program is considered income.
  • Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI): pays benefits to individuals that have worked in the past, paid Social Security taxes, and are currently unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. SSDI is considered income replacement. SSDI is different from Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSI is an income supplement program funded by general tax revenues and pays benefits based on financial need (not Social Security taxes). SSI is designed to help aged, blind, and disabled people who have little or no income and provides cash to meet basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter.
  • Money received from such sources:
  • Governmental and non-governmental pensions; (including military retirement pay);
  • Regular payments from railroad retirement benefits, strike benefits from union funds, worker’s compensation , and training stipends;
  • Alimony;
  • Merit based scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships i.e. the recipient may be determined by students’ athletic, academic, artistic, or other abilities;
  • Dividends, interest, net rental income, net royalties, periodic receipts from estates or trusts, and net gambling or lottery winnings;
  • Terminal leave pay, severance pay, or a cash out of accrued vacation leave;
  • Disaster Relief Employment Wages; and
  • On-the-Job Training (OJT) wages.

Exclusions from Family Income

  • Unemployment Compensation;
  • Child support payments;
  • Old age and survivors’ insurance benefits received under section 202 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 402);
  • Income earned while the veteran was in Active Military Duty, and certain other Veteran’s Benefits:  i.e., compensation for service-connected disability and service-connected death, vocational rehabilitation, and education assistance;
    • Military Pay or Allowances: Are there special rules that apply to veterans when income is a factor in eligibility determinations? (Sec. 667.255) Yes, under 38 U.S.C. 4213, when past income is an eligibility determinant for Federal employment or training programs, any amounts received as military pay or allowances by any person who served on active duty, and certain other specified benefits must be disregarded. This applies when determining if a person is a “low-income individual” for eligibility purposes (for example, in the WIOA youth, Job Corps or NFJP programs).  Questions regarding the application of 38 U.S.C. 4213 should be directed to the Veterans Employment and Training Service.
    • US Code: Title 38, Section 4213. Eligibility requirements for veterans under Federal employment and training programs: Any (1) amounts received as pay or allowances by any person while serving on active duty, (2) period of time during which such person served on such active duty, and (3) amounts received under chapters 11, 13, 30, 31, 35, and 36 of this title by an eligible veteran, any amounts received by an eligible person under chapters 13 and 35 of such title, and any amounts received by an eligible person under chapter 106 of title 10, shall be disregarded in determining eligibility under any public service employment program, any emergency employment program, any job training program assisted under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, any employment or training program carried out under Title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, or any other employment or training (or related) program financed in whole or in part with Federal funds.
    • Title 38:
      • Chapter 11 – Compensation for Service-Connected Disability or Death
      • Chapter 13 – Dependency and Indemnity Compensation for Service-Connected Deaths
      • Chapter 30 – All-Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program
      • Chapter 31 – Training and Rehabilitation for Veterans with Service-Connected Disabilities
      • Chapter 35 – Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance
      • Chapter 36 – Administration of Educational Benefits
    • US Code: Title 10, Chapter 106 – Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve
  • Federal non-cash benefits such as: Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, school lunches, and housing assistance;
  • Assets drawn down as withdrawals from a bank;
  • Public Assistance payments: Payments received under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), General Assistance (GA), Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA);
  • One time receipt of cash which includes: tax refunds; loans (which are debt and not income); one-time insurance compensation for injury or personal property loss; gifts and lump sum inheritances;
  • Job Corps payments;
  • Cash value of employer-paid or union-paid portion or health insurance or other employee fringe benefit;
  • Cash value of food or housing received in lieu of wages;
  • Payments received under the Trade Readjustment Act of 1974;
  • Needs-based scholarship assistance;
  • Financial assistance under Title IV of the Higher Education Act: e. PELL Grants, BEOG Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and Federal Work Study, PLUS, Stafford, and Perkins loans like any other kind of loan are debt and not income;
  • Stipends received in the following programs: VISTA, Peace Corps, Foster Grandparents Program, Retired Senior Volunteer Program; Youth Works/AmeriCorps Program;
  • Foster child care payments; and
  • All WIOA payments except OJT.
FAMILY LITERACY SERVICES – Services that are sufficient to make lasting changes in a family, and that integrate all of the following activities:
  • Literacy activities between parents and their children
  • Training for parents regarding how to be the primary teacher for their children and full partners in the education of their children
  • Parent literacy training that leads to economic self-sufficiency
  • An age-appropriate education to prepare children for success in school and life experiences.
FAMILY SIZE – The number of dependent children plus the number of parents or guardians who reside together. Use definitions in Family to arrive at the correct number.

Note:  An “individual with a disability” must, for purposes of income eligibility determination, be considered to be an unrelated individual who is a family unit of one consistent with the definition of Low Income Individual.

FEDERAL BONDING ASSISTANCE  – A Federal bond is an insurance policy that protects the employer in case of loss of money or property due to employee dishonesty. Bond coverage is provided for any person whose background usually leads employers to question their honesty such as ex-offenders, ex-addicts, poor credit records, dishonorably discharged from military service or persons from low income families lacking sufficient work history. Federal bonding assistance is the determining eligibility for and completion and submission of required forms and documentation on behalf of applicants requesting issuance of a federal surety bond.

FINANCIAL AID ASSISTANCE – Assistance in establishing eligibility for programs of financial aid assistance for training and education programs not provided under WIOA.

FINANCIAL LITERACY EDUCATION – 

(Youth program element 11) – Element eleven is financial literacy education in which youth providers provide financial empowerment tools to equip financial principles, an understanding of consumer protection issues, and an understanding of financial stability.  Financial literacy education may include, but not limited to the following activities:

  • creating budgets, initiate checking and savings accounts,
  • learning how to effectively manage spending, credit, and debt, including student loans, consumer credit, and credit cards;
  • teach the significance of credit reports and credit scores, what their rights are regarding their credit and financial information, how to determine the accuracy of a credit report, how to correct inaccuracies, and how to improve or maintain good credit;
  • protect themselves from and resolve cases of identity theft.

FISCAL AGENT – An organization, such as a bank or trust company, which acts on behalf of another party performing various financial duties.

FISCAL AGENT ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS-. Fiscal Agent personnel and non-personnel, direct and indirect costs that are associated with administrative functions of WIA/WIOA. Examples Accounting, budgeting, financial, and cash management functions. Payroll functions, personnel management functions, and development of systems and procedures required for administrative functions. Travel cost to carry out administrative activities or the overall management of the WIOA system.

FIXED AMOUNT AWARDS: A type of grant agreement under which the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity provides a specific level of support without regard to actual cost incurred under the Federal award.

FOLLOW-UP SERVICES FOR YOUTH – (Youth program element 9) – Element nine includes critical services provided following a youth’s exit from the program to help ensure the youth is successful in employment and/or postsecondary education and training. Follow-up services may include regular contact with a youth participant’s employer, including assistance in addressing work-related problems that arise. The five program elements that are permitted as follow-up services for youth are supportive services, adult mentoring, financial literacy education, labor market and employment information, and activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training.

FOLLOW-UP SERVICES FOR ADULTS AND DISLOCATED WORKERS

Follow up services must be made available for a minimum of 12 months following the first day of unsubsidized employment after exit.

Follow-up services must include more than only a contact attempted or made for securing documentation in order to report a performance outcome.

Follow-up may include, but is not limited to:

  • Contact with the participant’s employer,
  • Information about additional employment opportunities,
  • Counseling regarding the workplace, and/or
  • Referrals to supportive services available in the community.

FOSTER CHILD – An individual currently in foster care or has been in the Foster Care system at any point during his/her lifetime.

GAP IN SERVICE – A participant should not be considered as exited if there is a gap in service of greater than 90 days due to one of the following circumstances:

  • Delay before the beginning of training
  • Health/medical condition or providing care for a family member with a health/medical condition
  • Temporary move from the area that prevents an individual from participating in services, including National Guard or other related military service.

GED (General Education Development) – A certification obtained by passing the General Education Development Equivalency Test.  This test measure the skills and knowledge generally associated with four years of traditional high school instruction.

GOVERNOR’S COUNCIL FOR WORKFORCE and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (State Workforce Development Board) –The Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development consists of leaders from business, government, education and non-profit sectors.  The goal of the council is to jointly develop ways to coordinate workforce development with economic development.  The council works to develop creative solutions that expand and improve Oklahoma’s workforce, providing better jobs for workers and a skilled workforce for business and industry.

GRANT – A sum of money given by the government (Grantor) to a person or an organization (Grantee) for a specific purpose.

GRANT RECIPIENT – A non-Federal entity that receives a Federal aware directly from a Federal awarding agency to carry out an activity under a Federal program.  The term recipient does not include sub-recipients.

GROUP COUNSELING – Group counseling provides an opportunity to share experiences, learn perspectives, and experience with new behaviors in a supportive environment.

HIGH POVERTY AREA – In order to maintain consistency across the country, the USDOL has proposed that a high-poverty area be defined as a census track; a set of contiguous Census tracts; Indian Reservation, tribal land, or Native Alaskan Village; or a county that has a poverty rate of at least 30 % as set every five years using American Community Survey five year data.  https://www.census.gov/acs/www/data/data-tables-and-tools/data-profiles

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA EQUIVALENT – A GED or high school equivalency diploma recognized by the State of Oklahoma.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS – for the purpose of this program, shall be defined as programs administered by the Oklahoma Department of Education, chartered alternative schools, education at home leading to a high school diploma (home schools) pursuant to Section 4 of Article XIII of the Oklahoma Constitution, distant learning schools, correspondence and various religious schools that result in a high school diploma.

Note:  This would exclude any person who is seeking or attending a school or classes to acquire a GED or any other Skills school or post-secondary school that does not directly lead to a high school diploma.

HOMELESS – the term “homeless” or “homeless individual or homeless person” (from Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act 42 U.S.C. §11302) means:

  • An individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, or adequate nighttime residence;
  • An individual or family with a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodations for human beings, including a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport or camping ground;
  • An individual or family living in a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotels and motels paid for by Federal, State, or local government programs for low-income individuals or by charitable organizations, congregate shelters, and transitional housing);
  • An individual who resided in a shelter or place not meant for human habitation and who is exiting an institution where he or she temporarily resided;
  • An individual or family who:
    • will imminently lose their housing, including housing they own, rent, or live in without paying rent, are sharing with others, and rooms in hotels or motels not paid for by Federal, State, or local government programs for low-income individuals or by charitable organizations, as evidenced by—
  • a court order resulting from an eviction action that notifies the individual or family that they must leave within 14 days;
  • the individual or family having a primary nighttime residence that is a room in a hotel or motel and where they lack the resources necessary to reside there for more than 14 days; or
  • credible evidence indicating that the owner or renter of the housing will not allow the individual or family to stay for more than 14 days, and any oral statement from an individual or family seeking homeless assistance that is found to be credible shall be considered credible evidence for purposes of this clause;
    • has no subsequent residence identified; and
    • lacks the resources or support networks needed to obtain other permanent housing.
  • An unaccompanied youth and homeless families with children and youth defined as homeless under other federal statutes who:
    • have experienced a long term period without living independently in permanent housing;
    • have experienced persistent instability as measured by frequent moves over such period; and
    • can be expected to continue in such status for an extended period of time because of chronic disabilities, chronic physical health or mental health conditions, substance addiction, histories of domestic violence or childhood abuse, the presence of a child or youth with a disability, or multiple barriers to employment.

IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBER-(fiscal and conflict of interest definition) Includes one party with any of the following relationships to another party: (i) Spouse and parents, (ii) Children, and spouses, (iii) Parents, and spouses, (iv) Siblings and spouses, (v) Grandparents and grandchildren, and spouses, (vi) Domestic partner and parents including domestic partners of any individual in 2 through 5 of this definition, and (vii) Any individual related by blood or affinity whose close association with the employee is the equivalent of a family relationship.

INCENTIVE PAYMENT – Monetary payment given to a WIOA Youth participant for successful participation and achievement of expected outcomes as defined in the ISS upon completion of established benchmarks or upon final program completion. Incentives may be used to retain youth in a program and must be tied to training, education, or work readiness. Such achievements must be documented in the participants file as the basis for an incentive payment. Guidelines for the payment of incentives to youth participants must be described in local policy.

INCUMBENT WORKER TRAINING – Incumbent worker training is designed to meet the special requirements of an employer to retain a skilled workforce or avert the need to lay off employees by assisting the workers in obtaining the skills necessary to retain employment, and is conducted with a commitment by the employer to retain or avert the layoffs of the incumbent worker(s) trained. Incumbent Worker Training is made available to help companies grow and maintain competitiveness by investing in training of their existing workforce. Job training programs may include training designed to increase the basic skills of employees including, but not limited to, training in written and oral communication, mathematics or science, or training in technical and technological skills. Training is structured to be flexible to meet the business’s training objectives. To qualify as an incumbent worker, must be employed, meet the Fair Labor Standards Act requirements for an employer-employee relationship, and have an established employment history with the employer for 6 months or more, with the following exception: In the event that the incumbent worker training is being provided to a cohort of employees, not every employee in the cohort must have an established employment history with the employer for 6 months or more as long as a majority of those employees being trained meet the employment history requirement.

Incumbent worker training does not qualify an individual for participation in a WIOA program. An incumbent worker does not have to meet the eligibility requirements for career and training services for adults and dislocated workers under WIOA, unless they are also enrolled as a participant in the WIOA adult or dislocated worker program.

INDIVIDUAL COUNSELING – A short term resource designed to assist job seekers in obtaining or retaining employment. A confidential face-to-face service designed to provide the job seeker with an attentive listener who will offer suggestions to improve employment prospects and assist in the development of solutions to better manage work-related issues. Work-related issues may include stress, balancing work and home life, bullying, difficult colleagues, family difficulties, and substance misuse that can directly impact individual workplace performance. Individual workplace counseling is designed to work with the individual to obtain positive and secure employment, or to provide guidance on how to retain employment by developing strategies to reduce absence, improve interpersonal communication, increase self-awareness, increase the feeling of being valued and supported, reinforce appropriate skill use, identify competencies and how to capitalize on individual capabilities, improve employee performance, increase productivity, and manage behavioral problems.

INDIVIDUAL SERVICE STRATEGY – A service strategy which is jointly developed by the youth and the case manager based on the individual needs of the youth. The ISS must be linked to one or more indicator of performance, identify career pathways that include education and employment goals, consider career planning and the results of the objective assessment, and prescribe achievement objectives and services for the youth.

INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY – means an individual with any disability (as defined in Section 3 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (42 U.S.C. 12102)).

(1)         The term “disability” means, with respect to an individual

  • A physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual;
  • A record of such an impairment; or
  • Being regarded as having such impairment (as described in paragraph (3)).

[Note: this definition has been moved to Section 12103.]

(2)         Major Life Activities

(A) In general

For purposes of paragraph (1), major life activities include, but are not limited to, caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.

(B) Major bodily functions

For purposes of paragraph (1), a major life activity also includes the operation of a major bodily function, including but not limited to, functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions.

(3)         Regarded as having such an impairment

For purposes of paragraph (1) (C):

(A) An individual meets the requirement of “being regarded as having such an impairment” if the individual establishes that he or she has been subjected to an action prohibited under this chapter because of an actual or perceived physical or mental impairment whether or not the impairment limits or is perceived to limit a major life activity.

(B) Paragraph (1) (C) shall not apply to impairments that are transitory and minor. A transitory impairment is an impairment with an actual or expected duration of 6 months or less.

(4)         Rules of construction regarding the definition of disability

The definition of “disability” in paragraph (1) shall be construed in accordance with the following:

(A) The definition of disability in this chapter shall be construed in favor of broad coverage of individuals under this chapter, to the maximum extent permitted by the terms of this chapter.

(B) The term “substantially limits” shall be interpreted consistently with the findings and purposes of the ADA Amendments Act of 2008.

(C) An impairment that substantially limits one major life activity need not limit other major life activities in order to be considered a disability.

(D) An impairment that is episodic or in remission is a disability if it would substantially limit a major life activity when active.

(E)(i) The determination of whether an impairment substantially limits a major life activity shall be made without regard to the ameliorative effects of mitigating measures such as

(I) medication, medical supplies, equipment, or appliances, low-vision devices (which do not include ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses), prosthetics including limbs and devices, hearing aids and cochlear implants or other implantable hearing devices, mobility devices, or oxygen therapy equipment and supplies;

(II) use of assistive technology;

(III) reasonable accommodations or auxiliary aids or services; or

(IV) learned behavioral or adaptive neurological modifications.

(ii) The ameliorative effects of the mitigating measures of ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses shall be considered in determining whether an impairment substantially limits a major life activity.

(iii) As used in this subparagraph

(I) the term “ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses” means lenses that are intended to fully correct visual acuity or eliminate refractive error; and

(II) the term “low-vision devices” means devices that magnify, enhance, or otherwise augment a visual image.

INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYMENT PLAN (IEP) – An ongoing strategy jointly developed by the adult participant and the case manager that identifies the participant’s employment goals, the appropriate achievement objectives, and the appropriate combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals.

INDIVIDUAL SERVICE STRATEGY (ISS) – The ISS is an ongoing strategy jointly developed by the youth participant and the case manager, which identifies an age-appropriate employment / career goal, appropriate achievement objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the participant to reach these objectives.

INDIVIDUAL TRAINING ACCOUNT (ITA) – Funds that can be used by individuals who have been determined eligible under WIOA to receive training services.  Training funded by an ITA must be selected from the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL).

INFORMATION ON SUPPORTIVE SERVICES AVAILABLE – provision of information on the availability of supportive services including child care, child support, medical or child health assistance available through the State’s Medicaid program and children’s health insurance program; benefits under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and information about the earned income tax credit and other supportive services and transportation services provided though partner provided programs.

INFORMED CUSTOMER CHOICE – Choices made by customers using the best information available, including employment-related information (e.g., information about self, such as abilities and interests, knowledge of support services, training providers, etc.)

INITIAL ASSESSMENT – A process that provides an assessment of skill levels including literacy, numeracy, and English language proficiency, as well as aptitudes, abilities (including skills gaps), and supportive service needs.

IN-SCHOOL YOUTH (ISY) – In-school youth are youth not younger than 14 or older than 21 that are attending school.  Youth that are home schooled or virtual leaners are considered in-school youth.  To qualify as an in-school youth under WIOA Title 1, the youth must be low income and fall into one or more of the following categories.

  • Basic Skills Deficient
  • Individual with a Disability
  • An English language learner
  • An offender (juvenile who is or has been subject to any stage of the criminal justice process)
  • A homeless or runaway youth
  • In foster care or ages out of foster care
  • Pregnant or parenting
  • Requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment

INTERESTED PARTIES – sub-grantees, subcontractors, service providers, employees, One-Stop partners, and training providers

INTERNSHIPS (Youth Program Work Experience Element) – a planned, structured learning experience that takes place in a workplace (may be arranged within the private for-profit sector, the nonprofit sector, or the public sector) for a limited period of time. Internships may be paid or unpaid.

INTERNSHIPS/EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES (Youth program element 3) – A category of work experience opportunity directly linked to a career that takes place in a workplace for a limited period of time. Time spent in business, industry, or other agency for the purpose of providing a participant with opportunities to gain insight and direct experience related to one or more functions of the organization.

JOB MATCH – A process that allows individuals to make informed choices in determining career goals(s) used for the selection of needed services and/or training.  Occupations selected shall be demand occupations, lead to self-sufficient salaries, and be compatible with participants’ abilities, allowing them a probable chance for success.

JOB CLUB/WORKSHOPS – A structured environment of up to 2 weeks where job seekers attempt to obtain jobs under the guidance of staff that has all of the elements of a Job Search Workshop.

JOB DEVELOPMENT CONTACTS – Job Development occurs when a staff member contacts an employer about a specific job seeker to discuss the individual’s qualifications and explore their potential placement with the employer. The Job Development contact may be accomplished by telephone or personal visit to the employer.

JOB FINDING CLUBS – A period of structured application (up to 2 weeks) where job seekers attempt to obtain jobs, under the guidance of workforce staff, that has all of the elements of a Job Search Workshop.

JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES – The process by which workforce agencies, educational institutions, employment agencies, social service agencies and other entities help individuals find employment.

JOB REFERRAL – The act of bringing to the attention of an employer an applicant or group of applicants who are qualified and available to interview for a posted job opening.

JOB SEARCH PLANNING – After being determined employable, a plan (not necessarily a written plan) is jointly developed by staff and the participant that includes the necessary steps and/or timetables to achieve employment in a specific occupation, industry, or geographic area.

JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP – Workshop designed for individuals to gain successful job-hunting skills, such as resume writing, cover letter preparation, and interviewing skills.

JOB SHADOWING– Job Shadowing is when a participant follows an employee at a firm for one or more days to learn about a particular occupation or industry. One-on-one time is spent with employees in order for the participant to observe the daily routine of the employee(s). The opportunity should be made available to the participant to understand the daily duties and activities, ask questions, identify career interest, become aware of the technical and academic skills needed to enter the specific career, develop communication skills, and apply connection between academic classroom work and their career goals. Job shadowing is intended to explore a range of careers and specific career objectives in order to select an appropriate career pathway.

JOB SHADOWING(Youth program element 3) – A category of work experience where youth learn about a job by walking through the work day as a shadow to a competent worker. The job shadowing work experience is a temporary, unpaid exposure to the workplace in an occupational area of interest to the participant. Youth witness firsthand the work environment, employability and occupational skills in practice, the value of professional training, and potential career options. A job-shadowing experience can be anywhere from a few hours, to a day, to a week or more.

Job shadowing is designed to increase career awareness, help model youth behavior through examples, and reinforce in the youth and young adult the link between academic classroom learning and occupational work requirements. It provides an opportunity for youth to conduct short interviews with people in their prospective professions to learn more about those fields. Job shadowing can be thought of as an expanded informational interview. By experiencing a workplace first-hand, youth can learn a great deal more about a career than through research in print publications and on the Internet.

KEN (Key Economic Network) – KENs are areas in which labor market data suggest there are geographic similarities with regards to occupations, commuting patterns and local culture.  KENs are comprised of: a regional business Champion appointed by the Governor, regional businesses, economic development organizations, local economic developers, chambers of commerce, regional medical providers, Workforce Development Boards, private vocational schools, tribal representatives, and regional state workforce partners’ staff, among other local entities, organizations, and individuals dedicated to developing a skilled and educated Oklahoma workforce.

Geographical boundaries of KENs are suggested by data, but participation may be self-selected due to unique needs and locations of participants. Participants are welcome to connect with the closest KEN with which they identify.

KENs work to identify and assess existing local education and workforce resources and needs, as well as work to identify regional solutions to address their specific needs.  KENs will provide information and recommendations to the Governor, the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development, and State Workforce System Partner Leaders, in order to inform policy and allocate resources to best boost our citizens’ and state’s prosperity.

LABOR MARKET AREA – The term “labor market area,” means an economically integrated geographic area within which individuals can reside and find employment within a reasonable distance or can readily change employment without changing their place of residence. Such an area shall be identified in accordance with criteria used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor in defining such areas or similar criteria established by a Governor.

LABOR MARKET INFORMATION (Youth program element 13) – Element thirteen provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area.

LAYOFF: A separation of an employee from an establishment that is initiated by the employer; an involuntary separation; a period of forced unemployment. [Bureau of Labor Statistics]

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES (Youth Program Element) – are opportunities that encourage participation in activities related to leadership, decision-making, citizenship, and community service.  Engagement by youth in such activities should assist youth in gaining skills to become more responsible, employable, and to encourage other positive social behaviors.  Leadership opportunities may include some of the following activities:

  • Exposure to post-secondary educational opportunities
  • Community and service learning projects
  • Peer-centered activities, including peer mentoring and peer tutoring
  • Organizational and teamwork training, including team leadership training
  • Training in decision-making, including determining priorities
  • Citizenship training
  • Job Readiness
  • Life skills training
  • Personal financial management
  • Work readiness/Pre-employment skills

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES (Youth program element 6) – Element six includes opportunities that encourage responsibility, confidence, employability, self-determinant and other positive social behaviors.

LEARNING DISABILITY Any neurological condition that impedes a person’s ability to take in, store, process or express information.  It can affect one’s ability to read, write, and communicate.

LIFE SKILLS TRAINING (Youth Program Leadership Development Opportunities Element) – Activities and/or training that assist youth to develop marketable work habits.  May include modules/training/curriculum instruction in:  (a) personal finance and budgeting, (b) computers, (c) parenting/pregnancy prevention, (d) self-leadership (e.g. conflict resolution, public speaking, and anger management), (e) work behavior training, (f) banking, and other training that develops independent living skills.

LIMITED ENGLISH PROFIENCY – Persons who are unable to communicate effectively in English because their primary language is not English and they have not developed fluency in the English language.

LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY (LEP) INDIVIDUAL – an individual whose primary language for communication is not English and who has a limited ability to read, speak, write, and/or understand English. An LEP individual may be competent in English for certain types of communication (e.g., speaking or understanding), but still be LEP for other purposes (e.g., reading or writing).

LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY (LEP) PLAN – A written language access plan which assists in ensuring that LEP individuals have meaningful access to WIOA Title I-financially assisted programs and activities.

LINKAGES TO COMMUNITY SERVICE (Youth Program Supportive Service Element) – A supportive service which would consist of a referral/contact with community resources.  The services received through community resources would enable a youth to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.

LITERACY – An individual’s ability to read, write, and speak in English, compute, and solve problems, at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in the family of the individual, and in society.

In broad terms, literacy is the ability to identify, understand, interpret, create, compute and communicate meaning from and by the use of a variety of socially contextual symbols.  Within various levels of developmental ability, a literate person can derive and convey meaning, and use their knowledge to achieve a desired purpose or goal that requires the use of language skills, be they spoken or written.  A literate person can mediate their world by flexibly orchestrating meaning from one knowledge base and apply or connect it to another knowledge base.  Literacy involves a continuum of learning to enable an individual to achieve his or her goals, to develop his or her knowledge and potential, and to participate fully in the wider society.

LOCAL YOUTH PROGRAM – Those youth activities offered for youth in the Local Workforce Development Areas by youth providers and vendors.

LOCAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARD (LWDB) – Each state is divided into local workforce investment areas by the state.  Each one of these local workforce areas must have a local board called a Local Workforce Development Board (LWDB). Each LWDB is responsible for the development and oversight of the workforce development activities in its area.  LWDB responsibilities include selecting operators and providers of One-Stop services, as well as developing the list of eligible providers of training services; monitoring local system performance, and developing local performance measures with the State Workforce Investment Board/Council and governor.

LONG TERM UNEMPLOYED – An individual that has been unemployed for more than 27 weeks.

LOW INCOME FAMILY – means a family described in section 3(b)(2) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437a(b)(2))

LOW-INCOME INDIVIDUAL – The term “low-income individual” means an individual who:

  • Receives, or in the last 6 months has received, or is a member of a family this is receiving or in the past 6 months as received, assistance through the supplemental nutrition assistance program (SNAP), the program of block grants to States for temporary assistance for needy families program (TANF), or the supplemental security income program established under title XVI of the Social Security Act, or State or local income-based public assistance;
  • Is in a family with a total family income that does not excess the higher of:
    • The poverty line; or
    • 70 % of the lower living standard income level
  • Is a homeless individual (as defined in section 41403 (6) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994I42 U>S>C> 14043e-2(6))), or a homeless child or youth as defined under seciont725(2) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U>S>C> 11434a(2)));
  • Receives or is eligible to receive a free or reduced price lunch
  • Is a foster child on behalf of whom State or local government payments are made
  • Is an individual with a disability whose own income meets the low income requirement but who is a member of a family whose incomes does not meet the low income requirement.

LOWER LIVING STANDARD INCOME LEVEL (LLSIL) – The income level (adjusted for regional, metropolitan, urban, and rural differences and family size) determined annually by the Secretary of the Department of Labor based on the most recent lower living family budget issued by the Secretary.

MEANINGFUL ACCESS – Language assistance that results in accurate, timely, and effective communication at no cost to the LEP individual. For LEP individuals, meaningful access denotes access that is not significantly restricted, delayed, or inferior as compared to programs or activities provided to English proficient individuals.

MEDIAN EARNINGS/WAGE – The wage “in the middle.”  Meaning, half of the workers earned below the middle and half the workers earned above the middle.

MEDICAID – A program funded jointly with state and federal funds that helps with medical costs for some people with limited income and resources.  Medicaid also offers benefits not normally covered by Medicare, like nursing home care and personal care services.

MERIT TESTING – Tests given at a center as part of a cooperative agreement with the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES) as a requirement for applying to certain state jobs through OMES.

MICRO-PURCHASE – A purchase of supplies or services using simplified acquisition procedures, the aggregate amount of which does not exceed the micro-purchase threshold. Micro-purchase procedures comprise a subset of a sub-recipient’s small purchase in order to expedite the completion of its lowest-dollar small purchase transactions and minimize the associated administrative burden and cost. The micro-purchase threshold is set by the Federal Acquisition Regulation at 48 CFR Subpart 2.1 (Definitions). It is $3,000 except as otherwise discussed in Subpart 2.1 of the regulation, but this threshold is periodically adjusted for inflation.

MIGRANT SEASONAL FARMWORKER (MSFW) – A farmworker who is seasonal is primarily employed 12 consecutive months out of 24 months prior to contact/application, in agricultural or fish farming labor.  A farmworker who is migrant meets the definition of a seasonal farmworker and the labor requires travel to a jobsite which does not allow the farmworker to return to his permanent place of residence within the same day.  MSFWs may be migrant or seasonal farmworkers.

MILITARY SPOUSE: An individual who is:

  • married to an active duty service member, including one in the National Guard or Reserve; or
  • The surviving spouse of an active duty service member who lost his or her life while on active duty service in Afghanistan, Iraq, or other combat area.

MONITORING – A process usually directed by management to ensure processes and policies are being followed and are working as intended.

NAICS:  The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the purpose of collecting, analyzing and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy.

NATURAL DISASTER: Categories of natural disasters include, but are not limited to, any hurricane, tornado, storm, flood, high water, wind-driven water, tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, mud-slide, snowstorm, drought, fire, explosion, or other catastrophe.

NEEDS RELATED PAYMENTS –

Payments that may be made to adults or dislocated workers who are unemployed and do not qualify for, or have ceased to qualify for, unemployment insurance compensation for the purpose of enabling such individual to participate in WIOA career and training services.

A dislocated worker who has ceased to qualify for unemployment compensation may be eligible only if enrolled in training services:

  • By the end of the 13th week after the most recent layoff that resulted in a determination of the worker’s eligibility for employment and training activities for dislocated workers; or
  • If later, by the end of the 8th week after the worker is informed that a short term will exceed 6 months.

The level of payment to a dislocated worker shall not exceed the greater of:

  • The level of applicable unemployment insurance.
  • If the participant did not qualify for unemployment insurance, an amount equal to the poverty line, for an equivalent period, which may be adjusted to reflect changes in total family income.

NON-TRADITIONAL EMPLOYMENT – Occupations or fields of work for which individuals from one gender comprise less than 25 percent of the individuals employed in each such occupation or field of work.

OBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT/COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT– An assessment which includes a review of the academic and occupational skill levels, as well as the serve needs and strengths for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants. Assessments must also consider a youth’s strengths rather than just focusing on areas that need improvement.

OBLIGATION – The amount of orders placed, contracts and sub grants awarded, goods and services received, and similar transactions during a given period that will require payment by the grantee during the same or a future period. Obligation is a term that references actions where a commitment to pay exists. Obligation may occur at the time the services are rendered, or before services are rendered when a binding agreement has been entered into. Obligations are not plans, budgets, or encumbrances.

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS – Primary occupational skills encompass the proficiency to perform actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at entry, intermediate or advanced levels. Secondary occupational skills entail familiarity with, and use of set-up procedures, safety measures, work-related terminology, record keeping and paperwork formats, tools, equipment and materials, and breakdown and clean-up routines.

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS TRAINING – An organized program of study that provides specific vocational skills that lead to proficiency in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at entry, intermediate, or advanced levels. Occupational skills training includes training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that align with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area. This may include programs that help with skill upgrading or retraining. Occupational Skills training must be outcome-oriented and focused on an occupational goal specified in the individual employment plan, be of sufficient duration to impart the skill needed to meet the occupational goal, and result in attainment of a recognized postsecondary credential.

OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS TRAINING – YOUTH – (Youth program element 4) – Element four is an organized program of study that provides specific vocational skills that lead to proficiency in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at entry, intermediate, or advanced levels. Occupational skills training must be outcome-oriented and focused on an occupational goal specified in the individual service strategy, be of sufficient duration to teach the skills needed to meet the occupational goal, and lead to the attainment of a recognized postsecondary credential.

OKLAHOMA WORKS – Oklahoma Works is an initiative designed to increase the wealth of all Oklahomans by aligning education and training to produce a relevant workforce for Oklahoma’s companies. Oklahoma Works is built upon a coalition of businesses, educational institutions, state agencies, and other partners. This initiative is aligned with both the federal Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act (WIOA) and a 14-state National Governors Association (NGA) Policy Academy cohort.

In December 2015, Governor Fallin and key state leaders approved the Oklahoma Works Strategic Delivery Plan, which consists of four objectives and underlying strategies. They are:

Objective 1: ALIGN AND CONNECT: Develop, align, and connect the education and training pipeline with the needs of the state’s regional economies by coordinating strategic priorities and plans across the education and workforce system.

  • Career Options Exposure: Align Career Pathways and career options with the needs of Oklahoma businesses to ensure more Oklahomans are aware of viable paths to career entry and career building, exposed to careers at an earlier age, empowered with the information needed to best use valuable resources, and workforce-ready faster.
  • Postsecondary Opportunities in High School: Increase postsecondary opportunities in high school to ensure more students graduate high school with specialized knowledge or credentials to enter in-demand occupations, start businesses, or continue education with less time to completion.
  • Workforce Readiness: Align workforce readiness services among state programs and agencies, such that Oklahomans have the employability skills necessary to obtain wealth generating employment.
  • Transportation Services: Provide transportation to Oklahomans in rural and urban areas, in order to address the fundamental challenge of connecting education, training, and work opportunities with those citizens who need them most.

Objective 2: DATA: Integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success.

  •  Using Data to Decrease Labor Supply and Demand Gap: Utilize statewide data to decrease the skills gap by defining determinants and benchmarks along all levels of education and training that lead to employability in identified ecosystems, evaluating and utilizing competencies and assessments, and identifying and working to minimize existing data gaps.
  • OKJobMatch: Launch OKJobMatch as a free, web-based job-matching and labor market information system.  OKJobMatch will provide job seekers, employers, and training providers with easy-to-use tools that support a wide range of activities. Users may create and post a resume, determine eligibility for state- or federally funded workforce programs, search for the ideal job or job candidate, search for the ideal training or service provider and more.

Objective 3: PARTNERSHIPS: Build partnerships between local industry and education at the regional level.

  • Regional Partnerships: Cultivate and maintain productive relationships between regional employers, educators, and other workforce partners to ensure an appropriately skilled workforce.

Objective 4: RESOURCES: Optimize use of resources and incentives to achieve the Oklahoma Works goal.

  • Optimize Cross-Agency Resources: Identify and recommend creative, cross-agency, and cross-sector funding models that support similar workforce programs and include agency programs that potentially benefit from public-private partnerships.

OK CAREER GUIDE – OK Career Guide is an online career planning system for Oklahoma. This statewide career system is supported by the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education to serve a wider audience and, among other upgrades, provide more data to administrators. OK Career Guide replaces OKCIS and is found at www.OKCareerGuide.org.

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING – The term ‘‘on-the-job training’ ’means training by an employer that is provided to a paid participant while engaged in productive work in a job that—

  • provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job;
  • is made available through a program that provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50 percent of the wage rate of the participant, except as provided in section 134(c)(3)(H), for the extraordinary costs of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and
  • is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate.

ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM – A network that brings together workforce development, educational, and other human resource services in a seamless customer-focused service delivery arrangement that enhances access to the programs’ services and improves long-term employment outcomes for individuals receiving assistance. One-stop partners administer separately funded programs as a set of integrated streamlined services to customers.  The system must include at least one comprehensive physical center in each local area and may also have additional arrangements to supplement the comprehensive center. Required one-stop partner programs must provide access to programs, services, and activities through electronic means if applicable and practicable. This is in addition to providing access to services through the mandatory comprehensive physical one-stop center and any affiliated sites or specialized centers.  The design of the local area’s one-stop delivery system must be described in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) executed with the one-stop partners

ONE-STOP OPERATOR- One-stop operators may be a single entity (public, private, or nonprofit) or a consortium of entities. If the consortium of entities is one of the one-stop partners, it must include a minimum of three of the one-stop partners described in the regulations and below.  The one-stop operator may operate one or more one-stop centers, and there may be more than one one-stop operator in a local area.  The Local Board must select the one-stop operator through a competitive process at least once every 4 years.  The role of the one-stop operator is to coordinate the service delivery of required one-stop partners and service providers.  The competition for a one-stop operator must clearly articulate the role of the one-stop operator.

ONE-STOP OPERATOR ADMIN COSTS – One-Stop Operator personnel and non-personnel, direct and indirect, costs that are associated with administrative functions of WIA/WIOA Examples: Payroll, personnel, and property management.

ONE-STOP PARTNER – An entity described in section 121(b) (1) of WIOA that is part of the local one-stop system, entities that are responsible for administering their programs in the local area.  Section 678.400 of the Regulations list them as: WIOA Title 1, Wagner Peyser, adult education and literacy, Vocational Rehabilitation, SCSEP Title V Older Workers program; post-secondary career and technical education programs, Trade Adjustment Assistance, Jobs for Veterans State Grants, employment and training under Community Services Block Grants, employment and training activities under Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, programs of the Second Chance Act of 2007, and TANF.

O*NET:  The Occupational Information Network is a free online database that contains hundreds of occupational definitions to help students, job seekers, businesses and workforce development professional to understand today’s workforce.

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING – The term “on-the-job training” means training by an employer that is provided to a paid participant while engaged in productive work in a job that:

  • Provides knowledge or skills essential to the full and adequate performance of the job;
  • Is made available through a program that provides reimbursement to the employer of up to 50 percent of the wage rate of the participant, except as provided in section 134(c)(3)(H), for the extraordinary costs of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training; and
  • is limited in duration as appropriate to the occupation for which the participant is being trained, taking into account the content of the training, the prior work experience of the participant, and the service strategy of the participant, as appropriate

ON-THE-JOB-TRAINING (Youth program element 3) – A category of work experience that is limited to the period of time required for a participant to become proficient in the occupation for which the training is being provided. In determining the appropriate length of the contract, consideration should be given to the skill requirements of the occupation, the academic and occupational skill level of the participant, prior work experience, and the participant’s ISS. The participants cannot earn a self-sufficient wage or wages comparable to or higher than wages from previous employment. The OJT relates to the introduction of new technologies, introduction to new production or service procedures, upgrading to new jobs that require additional skills, workplace literacy, or other appropriate purposes identified by the Local WDB. Element Three is a planned, structured learning experience that takes place in a workplace for a limited period of time. Work experience may be paid or unpaid, as appropriate.

OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES – A written document that provides direction for step-by-step execution of actions necessary to perform identified processes.  Procedures must be developed with sufficient detail to be used for the following:

  • Executing functions
  • Training personnel
  • Conducting oversight

ORGANIZATIONAL & TEAMWORK TRAINING (Youth Program Leadership Development Opportunities Element) – Training that fosters the development of group or team interaction skills.

ORIENTATION TO WIOA SERVICES – Any activity providing information or orientation to services available through the one-stop delivery system.

OTHER RESPONSIBLE ADULT—for purposes of authorizing a minor to participate in WIOA programs, the signature of a parent, guardian, or other responsible adult is required.  This provision allows the local areas to enroll minors with the authorization of individuals other than a parent or legal guardian.  The definition of “other responsible adult” includes:

  • An adult relative with whom the individual resides.
  • An adult who has been delegated custodial or administrative responsibilities in writing, either temporarily or permanently, by parents or by an appropriate agency.
  • An agency or organization representative who is in a position to know the individual’s circumstances (i.e., that they could not get a parent’s or guardian’s signature authorizing participation), for example, a clergy person, a school teacher or other school official, a probation or other officer of the court, a foster parent.
  • A representative of an agency which provided support services to the individual and who is aware of the individual’s circumstances (i.e., that they cannot get a parent’s or guardian’s signature authorizing participation) for example, a social worker, a homeless shelter official, a child protective worker, a health clinic official.
  • Other responsible adults determined by the local board as appropriate to authorize the individual’s participation.

OUT OF AREA JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE – Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) provides financial assistance to assist eligible TAA participants in seeking employment in other areas of Oklahoma or the United States. A written application for assistance must be submitted before the job search trip begins. Application must be made within 365 days of separation date or petition certification date, whichever is later, or within 182 days after completion of training. The Job Search interview must be for a specific position at a specific company, and must be outside the state-defined commuting radius of 50 miles for potential eligibility. TAA pays up to 90% of approved costs, with a maximum benefit of $1250.

OUT OF AREA RELOCATION ASSISTANCE – Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) provides financial assistance to assist eligible TAA participants in relocating self and family to other areas of Oklahoma or the United States. A written application for assistance must be submitted before the relocation occurs. Application must be made within 425 days of separation date or petition certification date, whichever is later, or within 182 days after completion of training. The relocation must be for a specific position at a specific company, must be ‘suitable’ employment, and must be outside the state-defined commuting radius of 50 miles for potential eligibility. TAA pays up to 90% of approved costs, as well as a stipend of up to $1250 upon completion of relocation.

OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH (OSY) –   A youth between the ages of 16-24, not attending any school (as defined by state law, Oklahoma Code, Title 70-1-1006) with one or more of the following barriers:

  • Individual with a disability
  • School dropout
  • Not attended school for at least the most recent complete school year calendar quarter
  • A high school graduate who is low income and either an English language learner or basic skills deficient
  • An offender (juvenile who is or has been subject to any stage of the criminal justice process)
  • A homeless or runaway youth
  • In foster care or ages out of foster care
  • Pregnant or parenting
  • Low income and requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment

OUTCOME – Documented effect or impact of a service or intervention on an individual.  Outcomes are what the program efforts are designed to achieve.  Proposed outcomes must be stated in terms of measurable indicators.

OUTREACH / RECRUITMENT – Activities and strategies for identifying and contacting potential participants.  Strategies will include procedures that assure access throughout the service area and address appropriate access for participants with barriers.

PARTICIPANT – A reportable individual who has received staff-assisted services after satisfying all applicable programmatic requirements for the provision of services, such as an eligibility determination. 

PIRL – Participant Individual Record Layout used to report individual participant characteristics to the United State Department of Labor.

PEER CENTERED ACTIVITIES (Youth Program Leadership Development Opportunity Element) Peer-centered activities consist of activities such as peer mentoring or peer tutoring.  Youth learn leadership skills as peer mentors, assistant crew leaders, and receive additional training in leadership.

PEER SUPPORT GROUPS (Youth Program Follow-up Element) A support group where youth encourage development and offer appropriate peer centered activities among themselves.

PERMANENT CLOSURE: The term plant closing means the permanent shutdown of a single site of employment or one or more facilities or operating units within a single site of employment. An employment action that results in the effective cessation of production or the work performed by a unit, even if a few employees remain, is a closure.

PLACED IN FEDERAL TRAINING – Participant entered a training program supported by the Federal Government, such as WIOA-funded projects, TAA, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation and Job Corps.

PLANNED GAP IN SERVICE:  A participant shall not be considered exited if there is a gap in service of greater than 90 days but less than 180 days due to one of the following circumstances:

  • A delay before the beginning of training;
  • Health/medical condition or providing care for a family member with a health/medical condition; or
  • Temporary move from the area that prevents the individual from participating in services, including National Guard or other related military service.

The gap must be related to one of the above circumstances and can last no longer than 180 days.

A consecutive gap in service of up to 180 days following the initial 180 days may be entered if the gap is utilized to resolve the issues that prevented the participant from completing program services that lead to employment.

POST-EXIT EDUCATION/TRAINING LEADING TO CREDENTIAL – A service that can be entered during follow-up if a participant completed a secondary education program and obtained a secondary school diploma or its equivalency during program participation, exited the program, and has enrolled in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential after program exit.

POST-EXIT EDUCATION/TRAINING LEADING TO CREDENTIAL (Youth Service) – This service is to be utilized after a Youth participant exits the program and continues an education or training program that leads to a recognized credential, and can be entered into the youth’s S&T during follow-up.

POST SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION – The term “postsecondary educational institution” means an institution of higher education.

  • an educational institution in any State that –
    • admits as regular students only persons having a certificate of graduation from a school providing secondary education, or the recognized equivalent of such a certificate;
    • is legally authorized within such State to provide a program of education beyond secondary education;
    • provides an educational program for which the institution awards a bachelor’s degree or provides not less than a 2 year program that is acceptable for full credit toward such a degree;
    • is a public or other nonprofit institution; and
    • is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association, or if not so accredited, is an institution that has been granted pre-accreditation status by such an agency or association that has been recognized by the Secretary for the granting of pre-accreditation status, and the Secretary has determined that there is satisfactory assurance that the institution will meet the accreditation standards of such an agency or association within a reasonable time.

POST SECONDARY PREPARATION AND TRANSITION ACTIVITIES (Youth program element 14) – Element fourteen helps prepare youth for advancement to post-secondary education after attaining a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent. These services include exploring post-secondary education options including technical training school, community colleges, 4-year colleges and universities, and Registered Apprenticeships.

POST-TEST – A test administered to a participant after the initial test and at regular intervals during the program.

POVERTY GUIDELINES – Are a version of the Federal Poverty measure issued annually by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) in the Federal Register.  The guidelines are used for administrative purposes such as determining financial eligibility for assistance or services under a particular Federal program.

POVERTY LINE – The poverty line (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget, and revised annually in accordance with section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9902(2))) applicable to a family of the size involved.

PRE-APPRENTICESHIP – 

A program or or set of strategies designed to prepare individuals to enter and succeed in a registered apprenticeship program and has a documented partnership with at least one, if not more, registered apprenticeship programs. Pre-apprenticeship programs incorporate the following elements:

  • Training and curriculum based on industry standards and approved by the documented Registered Apprenticeship partner(s); and
  • Strategies that increase Registered Apprenticeship opportunities for underrepresented, disadvantaged or low-skilled individuals, such that, upon completion, they will meet the entry requirements, gain consideration, and are prepared for success in one or more Registered Apprenticeship program.

PRE-APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM – (Youth program element 3) – A category of work experience opportunity with a set of strategies designed to prepare an individual to enter and succeed in a registered apprenticeship program. The Pre-Apprenticeship work experience must lead to an industry recognized credential and have a documented relationship that provides a direct pathway into a registered apprenticeship program.

PRE-EMPLOYMENT SKILLS/JOB READINESS – including but not limited to creating a resume, job seeking and interviewing skills, understanding employer and workplace expectations, positive work habits (e.g. coming to work on time, getting along with coworkers, etc.), understanding behaviors and attitudes necessary to compete in the labor market, effective coping and problem-solving skills, and other skills as identified that will develop the individual’s capacity to move toward employment.

PREGNANT OR PARENTING YOUTH (Eligibility Barrier) – An individual who is under 25 years of age and pregnant; a youth (male or female) who is providing custodial care for one or more dependents who are under 18 years of age. Males do not qualify as a parenting youth until the child is born and financial or custodial care is provided by the male.

PRIMARY LANGUAGE – An individual’s primary language is the language in which an individual most effectively communicates, as identified by the individual.

PROCUREMENT –The process that leads to the purchase of goods and services, including awards of funds.

PROFICIENCY TESTING – Tests given to clients that measure competencies and/or ability for certain types of work related skills or applications, such as: data entry, keyboarding, spelling, math, typing or other proficiency tests.

PROFILING ORIENTATION – Those individuals who have been profiled by the Unemployment Insurance model as most likely to exhaust benefits and receive an Initial Assessment and introduction to the Workforce Center or office’s available services in a scheduled group setting.

PROGRAM DESIGN – The program design framework is an integral component of a local area’s youth services.  Funds allocated to a local area for eligible youth under WIOA shall be used to carry out, for eligible youth, programs that;

  • provide an objective assessment of the academic levels, skill levels, and service needs of each participant, which assessment shall include a review of basic skills, occupational skills, prior work experience, employability, interests, aptitudes (including interests and aptitudes for nontraditional jobs), supportive service needs, and developmental needs of such participant, for the purpose of identifying appropriate services and career pathways for participants, except that a new assessment of a participant is not required if the provider carrying out such a program determines it is appropriate to use a recent assessment of the participant conducted pursuant to another education or training program;
  • develop service strategies for each participant that are directly linked to 1 or more of the indicators of performance described in section 116(b)(2)(A)(ii), and that shall identify career pathways that include education and employment goals (including, in appropriate circumstances, nontraditional employment), appropriate achievement objectives, and appropriate services for the participant taking into account the assessment conducted pursuant to subparagraph (A), except that a new service strategy for a participant is not required if the provider carrying out such a program determines it is appropriate to use a recent service strategy developed for the participant under another education or training program;
  • provide:
    • activities leading to the attainment of a secondary
  • school diploma or its recognized equivalent,
  • or a recognized postsecondary credential;
  • (ii) preparation for postsecondary educational and training opportunities;
  • (iii)strong linkages between academic instruction (based on State academic content and student academic achievement standards established under section 1111 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311)) and occupational education that lead to the attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials;
    • preparation for unsubsidized employment opportunities, in appropriate cases; and H. R. 803—85
    • effective connections to employers, including small employers, in in-demand industry sectors and occupations of the local and regional labor markets; and
  • at the discretion of the local board, implement a pay-for-performance contract strategy for elements described in paragraph (2), for which the local board may reserve and use not more than 10 percent of the total funds allocated to the local area under section 128(b).

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT – An employer has publicly declared through the media the impending closure of a specific facility, including the planned date of final closure, and documented verification of such has been made to the state.

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE – Federal, State, or local government cash payments for which eligibility is determined by a needs or income test.

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE RECIPIENT – A participant that is listed on the grant and/or is receiving assistance under any of the following programs at the time of eligibility determination into the WIOA program.

  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
  • General Assistance (GA) (State/local government)
  • Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA)
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI-SSA Title XVI)

PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM – An ongoing project, or projects of lesser durations, that use confined or community security offenders to provide labor for the betterment of the public and/or government agency.

RAPID RESPONSE – An activity provided by a State, or by an entity designated by a State, with funds provided by the State under section 134 (a) (1) (A), in the case of a permanent closure or mass layoff at a plant, facility, or enterprise, or a natural or other disaster, that results in mass job dislocation, in order to assist dislocated workers in obtaining reemployment as soon as possible.  Services include:

  • Establishment of onsite contact with employers and employee representatives immediately after the State is notified of a current or projected layoff. In the case of a disaster, immediately after the State is aware of mass job dislocation as a result of the disaster;
  • provision of information on and access to available employment and training activities;
  • assistance in devising a strategy for assessing the employment and training needs of dislocated workers and obtaining services to meet such needs;
  • provision of emergency assistance adapted to the particular closure, layoff, or disaster; and
  • provision of assistance to the local community in developing a coordinated response and in obtaining access to State economic development assistance.

RECIPIENT – Any entity to which financial assistance under the WIOA Title I is extended, either directly from the Department of Labor (DOL) or through the Governor or another recipient (including any successor, assignee, or transferee of a recipient), but excluding the ultimate beneficiaries of the WIOA Title I funded program or activity. In addition, One-Stop partners, as defined in Section 121(b) of WIOA, are treated as “recipients” and are subject to the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements of 29 CFR Part 38, to the extent that they participate in the One-Stop delivery system.

REFERRAL TO EDUCATIONAL SERVICES – The referral of Job Seekers to a program or course designed to develop competency in basic educational skills such as reading comprehension, mathematics, writing, speaking and reasoning, and/or programs leading to educational credentials such as a GED, high school diploma or college degree.

REFERRAL TO EMPLOYMENT – A referral to employment is the act of bringing to the attention of an employer a job seeker or group of registered job seekers who are available for a job and the record of such referral.

REFERRAL TO FEDERAL/STATE ASSISTANCE AGENCIES – Referral to other Federal/State assistance programs such as;

  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP),
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF),
  • Health insurance assistance,
  • Child Support Assistance,
  • Tax Preparation Support, or
  • Other Federal or State Assistance programs.

REFERRAL TO WIOA SERVICE – Provision of referrals within the one-stop delivery system, other workforce development programs, and the Veterans Affairs for Title I services.

REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP – Registered Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job training and job-related technical instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Benefits of a registered apprenticeship program to an employer include skilled workers trained to industry/employer specifications, reduced turnover, an emphasis on safety training and a pipeline of new skilled workers. Benefits for the apprentice include earning wages while in training, portable credentials, and opportunities for jobs that usually pay higher wages.

REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP(Youth program element 4) – A category of Occupation Skills Training for youth that source of training and employment services to use as a career pathway for individuals seeking employment, and as a job-driven strategy for employers and industries.

REGISTRATION – Registration is the process of collecting information to support a determination of eligibility.  It begins with the initial demographic entry into the State’s virtual case management system registration results in a potential determination of eligibility for WIOA programs.

REGULATIONS –An authoritative rule dealing with details or procedures issued by an executive authority or regulatory agency of a government and having the force of law.

REQUIRES ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE –Defined by the state as a low income youth meeting one of the following criteria:

  • With a parent or legal guardian that is currently or previously incarcerated for a felony conviction;
  • With a parent or legal guardian who lacks a high school diploma or GED;
  • Who attends or has attended chronically under performing schools listed as a Targeted Intervention School on the State Department of Education website http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Targeted%20Intervention5.5.15.pdf, or a school listed a Focus Designation School on the State Department of Education website: http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Focus%20original%202014.pdf

RESUME ASSISTANCE – Providing instruction on the content and format of resumes and cover letters and providing assistance in the development and production of the same.

RFP- A solicitation, often made through a bidding process, by an agency or company interested in procurement of a commodity, service or valuable asset, to potential supplier to submit business proposals.

RUNAWAY YOUTH (Eligibility Barrier) – A youth under 18 years of age who removes himself or herself from home or place of legal residence without the permission of parents or legal guardian.

SCHOOL DROPOUT (Eligibility Barrier) The term “school dropout” means an individual who is no longer attending any school and who has not received a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.  Youth enrolled in alternative schools are not school dropouts.  A youth’s dropout status is determined at the time of application (eligibility) and remains in effect throughout her/his participation.  An individual who is out-of-school at the time of application (eligibility) and subsequently enrolled in an alternative school, may be considered an out-of-school youth for purposes of the

SCSEP –The Senior Community Service Employment Program is a federal program specifically targeted to serve older adults seeking employment and training assistance. Authorized by the Older Americans Act, the program provides training for low-income, unemployed seniors.  Participant also have access to employment assistance through American Job Centers.

SECONDARY SCHOOL – The term “secondary school” has the meaning given the term in section 14101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801).  This is generally referred to as high school.

SECONDARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS – Programs administered by the Oklahoma Department of Education.  It also includes, chartered alternative schools, education at home leading to a high school diploma (home schools) pursuant to Section 4 of Article XIII of the Oklahoma Constitution, distant learning schools, correspondence and various religious schools that result in a secondary school diploma.

SELECTIVE SERVICE REGISTRATION – Presidential Proclamation 4771 of July 2, 1980 requires that male persons born after December 31, 1959, who have attained their 18th birthday, register with Selective Service. Registration must be completed within 30 days of a male’s 18th birthday. Failure to register in timely manner does not relieve the duty to register.

Section 189 of WIOA requires all participants receiving assistance under WIOA to comply with Selective Service registration under the Military Selective Service Act. Section 3(a) of the Military Selective Service Act requires male citizens of the United States who are between 18 and 21 years of age, to present themselves for Selective Service registration at times and places determined by the President of the United States. Section 12, Subsection (g), of the Military Selective Service Act (as amended by provision contained in the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1987, P.L. 99-661) requires the registration status of all males born after December 31, 1959 be examined and confirmed.

Note: Verification may be made by inspecting the applicant’s Selective Service registration acknowledgment, or through the on-line Verification Web site: https://www.sss.gov/Home/Verification

SELF-CERTIFICATION – Where an individual signs an attestation that the information he/she submits to demonstrate eligibility for a program under title I of WIOA is true and accurate.  This would be used in circumstances where items required cannot readily be verified and it would cause an undue hardship for the individual.  Self-Certification would only be used in circumstances when all practical attempts to secure verification have failed.

SELF-DIRECTED DECISION MAKING PROCESS – A step-by-step decision making process that allows the participant to understand the problem, consider, and explore alternatives, and make informed decisions.

SELF-EMPLOYED: A gainfully occupied individual who works for himself or herself as opposed to a salaried or commissioned worker who is the employee of another.

Note: Family members and farm/ranch hands must provide documentation to substantiate that the self-employed farmer, rancher, professional, independent trade person, or other business person by whom (or with) they are employed meets the criteria under Category 3 of the WIOA dislocated worker eligibility criteria.

SERVICE PROVIDER –Any public agency, private nonprofit organization, or private-for-profit entity that delivers services to participants.  Awards to service providers may be made by contract, sub-contract, or other legal agreement.

SERVICE PROVISION COSTS – Service Provider personnel and non-personnel, direct and indirect, costs associated with the provision of services to participants. Example: Case management of participants in intensive training and training services.

SHORT TERM PRE-VOCATIONAL SERVICES – Skills development and/or instructions intended to fill skills gaps.  Short term pre-vocational services are not tied to a specific occupation and do not result in a certification or license. These services may include course-like services such as literacy and adult basic education, computer software or introduction to computer classes, GED preparation, as well as development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training.

SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION THRESHOLD – The dollar amount which an entity may purchase property or services using small purchase methods. Entities adopt small purchase procedures in order to expedite the purchase of items costing less than the simplified acquisition threshold. The simplified acquisition threshold is set by the Federal Acquisition Regulation at 48 CFR Subpart 2.1 (Definitions) and in accordance with 41 U.S.C 1908. The simplified acquisition threshold is currently $150,000, but this threshold is periodically adjusted for inflation.

SKILLS ASSESSMENT – Includes instruments or interviews with criteria that measure acquired skills.

SKILLS UPGRADING AND RETRAINING – Courses that develop professional competencies that are particularly relevant to a vocational/occupational goal. The training should result in an acquisition of transferable skills or an industry recognized certification or credential.

SKILL UPGRADING & RETRAINING – (Youth program element 4) – A category of Occupation Skills Training for youth that develops professional competencies that are particularly relevant to vocational/occupation goals set in the ISS. The training should result in an acquisition of transferable skills or an industry recognized certification or credential.

SNAP – The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program serves as the first line of defense against hunger.  It enables low-income families to buy nutritious food with Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards.  SNAP recipients spend their benefits to buy eligible food in authorized retail food stores.

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY INSURANCE (SSDI) – A program that enables workers who are employed in covered employment and have a medical condition that meets Social Security’s definition of disability to collect benefits while they are unable to work.

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER (SSN) – The SSN is a nine-digit identification number assigned to the applicant by the Social Security Administration under the Social Security Act.  If an applicant does not have a Social Security Number, the Local Area or sub-recipient should assist him/her in obtaining one from the Social Security Administration.

In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Labor or a sub-recipient may not deny to any individual any right, benefit or privilege provided by law because of the individual’s refusal to disclose his/her Social Security Number. However, the sub-recipient can properly require disclosure of an individual’s social security account number pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code where it is used as the identifying number of such individual for the purposes of a return, statement or other document required under the code (i.e. for payment of wages for OJT, Work Experience, etc.). Sub-recipients should advise applicants at the time of application of the use(s) made of the Social Security Number.

SOFT SKILLS – Assistance with the development of interpersonal people skills, social skills, communication skills, character traits, attitudes, career attributes, social intelligence and emotional intelligence to improve the ability of participants to effectively navigate their environment, work well with others, perform well, and achieve their goals when matched with occupational skills to increase the desirable qualities for a specific employment.

SOONER CARE – A health coverage program jointly funded by the funded by the federal and state government.  This program helps pay some or all medical bills for many people who can’t afford them.  The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) is the state agency that administers the program and determines financial eligibility for the program.

STEM- Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

STEM OCCUPATIONAL SKILLS TRAINING (Youth program element 4) – A category of Occupation Skills Training for youth that is STEM related.

STIPEND – A Stipend is a fixed regular monetary payment made to a WIOA Youth participant during his/her enrollment to encourage the WIOA youth to participate in certain activities (seat time payments).  The stipend can be used for activities such as classroom instruction.  Stipends may be paid based on actual hours of attendance.  The guidelines providing stipend payments to youth participants must be described in local policy.

STUDY SKILLS TRAINING (Youth Program Tutoring Element) Study skills are strategies and methods of purposeful learning.  Study skills training is designed to improve learning ability and may include but is not limited to learning styles, time management, study habits, and listening and writing skills.

SUB-RECIPIENT-The legal entity to which an award is made and which is accountable to the grant recipient for the use of the funds provided. For WIOA purposes, distinguishing characteristics of a sub-recipient include items such as: determining eligibility of applicants, enrollment of participants, performance measured against meeting the objectives of the program, responsibility for programmatic decision-making, responsibility for compliance with program requirements, and use of the funds awarded to carry out a WIOA program or project.  Service Providers are considered sub-recipients not contractors.

SUBSTANTIAL/MASS LAYOFF: Any reduction in force, including those who have received a notice of layoff, that is not the result of a plant closing and that result in an employment loss at a single site of employment during any 30-day period for:

  • At least 33 percent of the employees (excluding employees regularly working less than 20 hours per week); and
  • At least 50 employees (excluding employees regularly working less than 20 hours per week); or
  • At least 500 employees (excluding employees regularly working less than 20 hours per week).

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES – (Youth Program Element) a program for youth operated during the summer months as part of a comprehensive strategy for addressing the youth’s employment and training needs. The summer youth employment opportunity element is not intended to be a stand-alone program. It provides summer employment opportunities that link academic and occupational learning as part of the required youth program elements.  Summer youth employment must provide direct linkages to academic and occupational learning, such as coordinating with school systems and may provide other elements and strategies as appropriate to serve the needs and goals of the participants.

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT/INTERNSHIP (Youth program element 3) – A category of work experience opportunity directly linked to a career that takes place in a workplace over the summer months. Time spent in business, industry, or other agency for the purpose of providing a participant with opportunities to gain insight and direct experience related to one or more functions of the organization.

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM – A federal program administered by the State that enables low-income families to buy nutritious food with Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards.  Eligibility for SNAP benefits is based on the number of people in the household and the amount of income available to the household.   SNAP is sometimes referred to as food stamps.

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME (SSI) – The SSI program is a Federal income supplement program funded by general tax revenues (not Social Security taxes).  It pays benefits to disabled adults and children who have limited income and resources.  It provides cash to meet basic needs for food, clothing and shelter.  SSI benefits are also payable to people 65 or older without disabilities who meet the financial limits.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES – Services that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.  As determined by local policy, supportive services may include:

  • Linkages to community services;
  • Assistance with transportation costs;
  • Assistance with childcare and dependent care costs;
  • Assistance with housing costs;
  • Referrals to medical services;
  • Assistance with uniforms or other appropriate work attire and work-related tools costs, including such items as eyeglasses and protective eye gear.
  • Assistance with books, fees, school supplies, and other necessary items for students enrolled in postsecondary education classes; and
  • Payments and fees for employment and training-related applications, tests and certifications.

Supportive services must be coordinated with partner entities.

Note: Supportive Services provided to youth participants must be appropriate to the needs of the individual youth as defined in their Individual Service Strategy and documented in enrollment notes.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES – (Youth program element 7) – Element seven include services that enable an individual to participate in WIOA activities.  These services include, but are not limited to, the following;

  • Linkages to community services;
  • assistance with transportation;
  • assistance with child care and dependent care;
  • assistance with housing;
  • needs-related payments;
  • assistance with educational testing;
  • reasonable accommodations for youth with disabilities;
  • legal aid services;
  • referrals to health care;
  • assistance with uniforms or other appropriate work attire and work-related tools, including such items as eyeglasses and protective eye gear;
  • assistance with books, fees, school supplies, and other necessary items for students enrolled in postsecondary education classes; and
  • payments and fees for employment and training-related applications, tests, and certifications.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICE COSTS – Costs for services that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized under the WIOA. Examples: transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, and needs related payments.

SYSTEM COSTS -Cost necessary for the functioning of the workforce system.  Examples: Office supplies, rental and maintenance of office space, rental or purchase of equipment, and utilities, and other maintenance services.

TAA FORM 856 – Information or instructions on completion of TAA application.

TAA JOB SEARCH ALLOWANCE – Financial assistance granted to an adversely affected worker to assist the individual in securing a job within the United States. This assistance may include cost of travel and cost of lodging and meals.

TAA RELOCATION ALLOWANCE – Financial assistance granted to an adversely affected worker to assist the individual and the individual’s family, if any, to relocate to accept suitable employment within the area of intended relocation.

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF) – A federally funded program for children deprived of support because of a parent’s death, incapacity, absence or unemployment.  Cash assistance is available to the family on a time limited basis to meet basic needs.  Activities that lead to employment are required of most parents or needy caretakers who receive a TANF payment. Qualified families may be eligible for support services such as child care assistance, vocational training, and employment placement assistance. Applicants for TANF benefits based on the absence of a parent are automatically referred to their State IV-D agency in order to establish paternity and/or to obtain child support from the noncustodial parent

TITLE 1 PROGRAMS –   Adult, Dislocated Worker and Youth programs are a Core (required) program in the Workforce System.  WIOA Title1.

TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA) – TAA is a federal program that provides a path for employment growth and opportunity through aid to U.S. workers who have lost their jobs as a result of foreign trade whose companies have been certified as Trade Impacted.  The TAA program seeks to provide trade-affected workers with opportunities to obtain the skills, resources and support they need to become reemployed. The program benefits and services for workers are administered by the U.S. Department of Labor.

TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND CAREER TRAINING GRANT PROGRAM (TAACCCT) – A grant made available to training facilities (community colleges and/or private schools) to help them develop specialized training programs with an emphasis on identifying a need for special skills in a community, and training & matching TAA clients (or other dislocated workers) with the specialized training and new occupation.

TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA) JOB SEARCH ALLOWANCE – Financial assistance granted to an adversely affected worker to assist the individual in securing a job within the United States. This assistance may include cost of travel and cost of lodging and meals.

TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA) RELOCATION ALLOWANCE – Financial assistance granted to an adversely affected worker to assist the individual and the individual’s family, if any, to relocate to accept suitable employment within the area of intended relocation.

TRAINING IN DECISION MAKING (Youth Program Leadership Development Opportunity Element) – Includes but is not limited to determining priorities and setting goals.

TRAINING SERVICES.—Training services may include— (i) occupational skills training, including training for nontraditional employment; (ii) on-the-job training; (iii) incumbent worker training (iv) programs that combine workplace training with related instruction, which may include cooperative education programs; (v) training programs operated by the private sector; (vi) skill upgrading and retraining; (vii) entrepreneurial training; (viii) transitional (ix) job readiness training provided in combination with services described in any of clauses (i) through (viii); (x) adult education and literacy activities, including activities of English language acquisition and integrated education and training programs, provided concurrently or in combination with services described in any of clauses (i) through (vii); and (xi) customized training conducted with a commitment by an employer or group of employers to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

TRANSITIONAL JOBS – Time limited, wage paying jobs that are unsubsidized and combine real work, skill development, and support services to individuals with substantial barriers to employment or who have an inconsistent work history.

TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE – A supportive service which provides assistance with transportation costs that is necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.

TUTORING – Instruction designed to increase basic skills level.  Tutoring can be provided as a group activity, one-on-one service or via computer based programs through partnering agencies or workforce centers.

Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction, and dropout Prevention Services (Youth program element 1) – Element one includes “tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential.” includes “tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential.” Such services focus on providing academic support, helping a youth identify areas of academic concern, assisting with overcoming learning obstacles, and providing tools and resources to develop learning strategies. Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction can be provided one-on-one, in a group setting, through resources and workshops.

Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized or for a recognized postsecondary credential.

It’s focused on in-school services relating to attainment of a high school diploma. Includes:

  • Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction that lead to a high school diploma
  • Secondary school dropout prevention services intended to lead to a high school diploma
  • Does not include dropout recovery strategies that lead to completion of high school equivalency – those are included in program element 2
  • Does not include training services leading to a postsecondary credential – those are included in program element 4 (occupational skills training)

UNDEREMPLOYED –   Underemployment occurs  when an individual is working part time but desires full-time employment or is working in employment not commensurate with the individual’s demonstrated level of educational attainment—e.g., a college graduate in microbiology can find no work in his or her field and is working as a clerk in a department store. [DOL Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) 14-00, Change 1]

UNEMPLOYED – An individual who is without a job and who wants and is available for work.  The determination of whether an individual is without a job shall be made in accordance with the criteria used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor in defining individuals as unemployed.

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS ASSISTANCE – Staff-assisted provision of information on-site, by phone, or via other technology by staff who are properly trained in UI claims, filing, and/or the acceptance of information necessary to file a claim.

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE (UI) A program providing cash benefits to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own (as determined under State law), and who meet other eligibility requirements of State law.

UNOBLIGATED FUNDS – Funds appropriated but remaining uncommitted by contract at the end of a fiscal period.

UNSUBSIDIZED EMPLOYMENT – Employment not financed from funds provided under WIOA or the Trade Act (which includes for reporting purposes entry into the United States Armed Forces); entry into employment in a registered apprenticeship program, and terminus who became self-employed.

VETERAN – The term “eligible veteran” means a person who (a) served on active duty in the military, naval or air service (of the United States) for a period of more than 180 days and was discharged or released there from with other than a dishonorable discharge; or (b) Was discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; or (c) Was discharged as a member of a reserve component under an order to active duty pursuant to section 672(a), (d), or (g), 673, or 673b of Title 10, who served on active duty during a period of war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge is authorized and was discharged from such duty with other than a dishonorable discharge. [38 USC 2011(4)]

  1. Campaign Veteran

Served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge or expeditionary medal has been authorized as identified and listed by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM). An updated listing of those campaigns may be obtained on the OPM website: http://www.opm.gov/veterans/html/vgmedal2.htm.

  1. Vietnam-era Campaign Veteran

Served in the active U.S. military and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable during the Vietnam-era (the period beginning February 28, 1961 and ending May 7, 1975, if the veteran served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period; and the period beginning August 5, 1964 and ending May 7, 1975 in all other cases).

  • Disabled Veteran

Entitled to compensation regardless of rate (include those rated at zero percent) for a disability under laws administered by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA), or who was discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability.

  1. Special Disabled Veteran

Individual’s disability is rated at thirty percent or more by the DVA, or at 10 or 20 percent for a serious employment disability.

  1. Recently Separated Veteran

A veteran who applied for participation under WIOA Title I within 12 months after discharge or release from active military duty.

Note:  The term “active” means full-time duty in the Armed Forces, other than duty for training in the reserves or National Guard. Any period of duty for training in reserves or National Guard, including authorized travel, during which an individual was disabled from a disease or injury incurred or aggravated in the line of duty is considered “active” duty.  38 USC, Section 101 (27) defines “reserve component” to include the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard.  The revised definition of “eligible veteran” includes members of reserve components activated during any “period of war” including the Persian Gulf conflict, August 5, 1990, with an ending date not yet announced by the President. It matters not where such an “eligible veteran” served, only that they served during a period of war. For example, many reserve components activated during the Persian Gulf period of war did not serve in the Persian Gulf Theater of operation. However, if those reserve components were activated by subsection of Title 10, the member(s) of those units will now be considered an “eligible veteran”.

VETERANS CASE MANAGEMENT SERVICES – Non-VR&E (Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Service) – Any veteran for whom a local staff member, primarily a Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP), has elected to provide on-going, one-on-one personal assistance including, but not limited to, providing advice pertaining to vocational choice, assistance in obtaining training to reach employability and follow-up services over a period of time.

VETERANS CASE MANAGEMENT SERVICES VR&E (Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Service) – All veterans for whom a local office member, primarily a Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist (DVOP), has been assigned to provide on-going, one-on-one personal assistance including, but not limited to, providing advice pertaining to vocational choice, assistance in obtaining training to reach employability and follow-up services over a period of time to obtain employment. Services are provided through a cooperative agreement between Veterans Administration and VETS for clients enrolled in training, post training, or just employment services only.

VETERANS PLACED IN FEDERAL TRAINING – Disabled veterans who are eligible for training under the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) vocational rehabilitation program may enroll for training or work experience at an agency under the terms of an agreement between the agency and the VA. The veteran is not a Federal employee for most purposes while enrolled in the program, but is a beneficiary of the VA. The training is tailored to individual needs and goals so there is no set length. If the training is intended to prepare the individual for eventual appointment in the agency rather than just work experience, the agency must ensure that the training will enable the veteran to meet qualification requirements for the position.

VETERANS PRIORITY OF SERVICE – The Jobs for Veterans Act of 2002 established priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses.  This was done as an important acknowledgement of the sacrifices of the men and women who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Priority requires that DOL funded programs give qualified veterans and their spouses first consideration for participation in a program if they meet the eligibility criteria for that program.

VETERANS REFERRAL FOR CREDENTIALING ASSISTANCE – 

Referrals made to agencies that may offer assistance in funding, teaching, issuance, and/or granting the credentials necessary to achieve employment in the required fields. This referral will include assistance for those veterans with training and skills obtained in their military service which may qualify them to seek and obtain credentials such as a License, Certificate, or required certification for employment/practice. (Registration form and instructions for Licensing and Certified Occupations available in Outlook under Veterans Services.)

VETERANS REFERRAL TO FEDERAL TRAINING – Veterans who are referred to any job-training program supported by the Federal Government, such as special funded projects, TAA, and Job Corps. (This does not include referrals to Disabled Veterans Administration – On the Job Training.)

VETERANS REFERRAL TO A FEDERAL JOB – All veterans who are referred to a job opening filed with a placement office by a department or agency of the Federal Government or other entity under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

VETERANS REFERRAL TO VR&E – Referral of veteran job seeker to the Veterans Administration. The veteran so referred is part of the staff person’s Case Management list of veterans who receive counseling, and all other services available under Case Managed duties. (When a veteran is accepted into VR&E, services may be extended at the end of training, rehabilitation, or employment services only, at the request of the Veterans Administration).

VETERANS TRANSITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP) -Any veteran, spouse of a veteran, or any qualified dependent of a veteran attending the Transition Assistance Program (TAP) Workshop in conjunction with personnel exiting military service within 1 year of separation or 2 years of retirement. Transition Assistance Program helps service members and their spouses make the initial transition from military service to the civilian workplace. TAP consists of a comprehensive three-day workshop at selected military installations nationwide. Professionally trained workshop facilitators from the state employment services, military family support services, department of Labor contractors, or VETS’ staff, present the workshops.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION – The term “vocational education” means organized educational programs offering sequences of courses directly related to preparing individuals for paid or unpaid employment in current or emerging occupations requiring other than a baccalaureate or advanced degree.  Programs include competency-based applied learning, which contributes to an individual’s academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning, problem solving skills, and the occupational-specific skills necessary for economic independence as a productive and contributing member of society.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION – Vocational rehabilitation, as provided by state vocational rehabilitation agencies authorized under the federal Rehabilitation Act, refers to a combination of services that are individually planned to enable an individual with a disability to prepare for, secure, retain, advance in, or regain employment that is consistent with the individual’s strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice.

Vocational rehabilitation services may include (but are not limited to)—

  • An assessment to determine eligibility and rehabilitation needs;
  • Counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice;
  • Vocational, college and other training (after effort has been made to secure government grants to cover the cost of such training);
  • Personal and vocational adjustment services, books, and other training materials;
  • Diagnosis and treatment of physical and mental impairments, to the extent such services are not available to the individual from other sources such as personal health insurance;
  • Transportation for participating in rehabilitation services;
  • Interpreter and reader services;
  • On-the-job or other personal assistance needed while participating in rehabilitation services;
  • Instruction in communication, daily living, and mobility skills for individuals who are blind;
  • Rehabilitation technology, devices and training;
  • Occupational licenses, tools, equipment and initial stocks and supplies;
  • Employment-related services such as job search assistance and job placement;
  • Post-employment services to help an individual retain or advance in employment;
  • Transition services for students with disabilities to help them move successfully from school to work and post-secondary life;
  • Supported employment;
  • Customized employment;
  • Referral to services needed but not provided directly by the VR agency.

Rehabilitation is a Core (required) program in the Workforce System.  WIOA Title IV.

WAGNER-PEYSER – The Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933 established a nationwide system of public employment offices commonly known as the Employment Service.  The Act was amended in 1998 to make the Employment Service part of the One-Stop service delivery system. Wagner-Peyser is a Core (required) program in the Workforce System.  WIOA Title III.

WELFARE AND/OR PUBLIC ASSISTANCE RECIPIENT – An individual who receives assistance   based on low income eligibility guidelines.  TANF, SNAP, Medicaid, and Child Care Subsidy are examples of public assistance programs.

WIASRD – Individual records that contain participant characteristics, activities, and outcome information.  The information captured in the WIASRD is used to generate program performance for WIA Title 1 Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs.  The WIASRD may be replaced with the Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) for reporting individual records of those served by WIOA.

WIOA – The Workforce Investment Opportunities Act was signed into law on July 22, 2014, by President Barack Obama.  The act is designed to help job seeker access employment, education, training, and supportive services to succeed in the labor market and to match employers with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy.  WIOA replaces the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and retains and amends the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, the Wegner Peyser Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

WORK ATTIRE AND WORK RELATED TOOLS – A supportive service that provides assistance with uniforms or other appropriate work attire and work-related tool cost, including such items as eyeglasses and protective eye gear that is necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized by WIOA.

WORK EXPERIENCE – Work experiences are planned, structured learning experiences that take place in a workplace for a limited amount of time. A work experience may be paid or unpaid, and may be in the private, non-profit, or public sectors.

Work experiences are designed to gain exposure to the working world and its requirements, and to help acquire the personal attributes, knowledge and skills needed to obtain a job and advance in employment. The purpose is to provide the participant with the opportunities for career exploration and skill development, not to benefit the employer, although the employer may, in fact, benefit from the activities performed. Work experiences may include the following:

  • Instruction in employability skills or generic workplace skills;
  • Exposure to various aspects of a particular industry;
  • Progressively more complex tasks;
  • Internships and job shadowing;
  • Integration of basic academic skills into work activities;
  • Supported work, work adjustment, and other transition activities;
  • Entrepreneurship;
  • Service learning;
  • Paid and unpaid community service; and
  • Other elements designed to achieve the goals of work experience.

WORK EXPERIENCE – Youth (Youth program element 3) – Element three is a planned, structured learning experience that takes place in a workplace for a limited period of time. Work experience may be paid or unpaid, as appropriate. A work experience may take place in the private for-profit sector, the non-profit sector, or the public sector. Labor standards apply in any work experience where an employee/employer relationship, as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act and State law. Work experiences provide the youth participant with opportunities for career exploration and skill development. Work experiences must include academic and occupational education:

  • The educational component may occur concurrently or sequentially with the work experience;
  • The academic and occupational education component may occur inside or outside the work site;
  • The work experience employer can provide the academic and occupational component or such components may be provided separately in the classroom or through other means;
  • Local areas have the flexibility to decide who provides the education component;
  • The academic and occupational education component refers to contextual learning that accompanies a work experience. It includes the information necessary to understand and work in specific industries and/or occupations;
  • Local programs have the flexibility to determine the appropriate type of academic and occupational education necessary for a specific work experience.

WORKFORCE CENTER SERVICE – Information or instructions on how to access the variety of services and tools available in the Workforce Center.

WORKFORCE INFORMATION SERVICES – Workforce information services provide information or instruction on how to access the variety of serve and tools available in the workforce center.

WORKFORCE PREPARATION ASSISTANCE – Providing assistance that helps an individual acquire a combination of basic academic skills, critical thinking skills, digital literacy skills, and self-management skills, including competencies in utilizing resources, using information, working with others, understanding systems, and obtaining skills necessary for successful transition into and completion of postsecondary education, or training, or employment.

WORKFORCE SYSTEM – A network of federal, state, and local offices that function to support economic expansion and develop the talent of our nation’s workforce.  The workforce system works in partnership with employers, educators, and community leaders to foster economic development and high-growth opportunities in regional economies.  The system exists to help businesses find qualified workers to meet their present and future business needs.

WORK OPPORUNITY TAX CREDIT (WOTC) The Work Opportunity Tax Credit was enacted as a federal tax credit program available to employers who hire new employees from “targeted” groups which have historically had difficulty in finding employment.  The credit is used to reduce the federal tax liability.  Targeted groups include:

  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) – An individual must have received, or be a member of a family that received TANF benefits for at least 9 months during the 18 month period ending on the hiring date.
  • Veterans (Disabled Veteran- 10%)UN Vet—   veteran who is a member of a family that received SNAP benefits (food stamps) for at least a 3-month period during the 15-month period ending on the hiring date; or
  • A disabled veteran entitled to compensation for a service-connected disability, who has been:
    • Hired within 1 year of discharge or release from active duty, OR
    • Unemployed for at least 6 months in the year ending on the hiring date; or
  • A veteran who has been unemployed for:
    • At least 4 weeks in the year ending on the hiring date; or
    • At least 6 months in the year ending on the hiring date.

Please note that to have veteran’s status to be eligible for WOTC, an individual must:

  • Have served on active duty (not including training) in the U.S. Armed Forces for more than 180 days, OR have been discharged or released from active duty for a service-connected disability; AND
  • Not have a period of active duty (not including training) of more than 90 days that ended during the 60-day period ending on the hiring date.
  • Ex-Felon—a person convicted of a felony and has a hiring date which is not more than one (1) year after the last date on which he/she was convicted or was released from prison. Economic eligibility is no longer required.
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Recipient—a person with a disability who has received or is receiving vocational rehabilitation from a rehabilitation agency approved by the state or Department of Veteran Affairs.
  • Food Stamp Recipient—a person who is at least 18 through 39 years of  age and is a member of a family that has received food stamps for the last 6 months; or received food stamps for at least 3 of the last 5 months, and is no longer receiving them.
  • SSI Recipient—a person receiving Supplemental Security Income benefits for any month during the 60 days preceding the date of hire.
  • Designated Community Resident—a person age 18 through 39 and principal residence in an Empowerment Zone, Renewal Community, and Rural Renewal County.
  • Summer Youth—a person at least 16 but not yet 18 on the hiring date and who has a principal residence in an Empowerment Community or Enterprise Zone.
  • Long-Term Family Assistance—a member of a family that received TANF/AFDC for at least 18 consecutive months or whose benefits expired after 8-5-1997 and who have a hire date that is not more than two (2) years after their eligibility expired.

The Eligibility Process involves the submission of completed federal forms to the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission. Then eligibility determination will be made based on a review of the information and documentary evidence supplied by employer/consultants.  If the employee is determined to be eligible, a Certification will be issued to the employer/consultants.

WORK READINESS SKILLS GOAL – A measurable increase in work readiness skills include world of work awareness, labor market knowledge, occupational information, values clarification and personal understanding, career planning and decision-making, and job search techniques (resumes, interviews, applications, and follow-up letters). Included are positive work habits, attitudes, and behavior such as punctuality, regular attendance, presenting a neat appearance, getting along and working well with others, exhibiting good conduct, following instructions and completing tasks.  This also can cover accepting constructive criticism from supervisors and co-workers, showing initiative and reliability, and assuming the responsibilities involved in maintaining a job. This category also entails developing motivation and adaptability, obtaining effective coping and problem-solving skills, and acquiring an improved self-image. Not possessing these skills would indicate the individual is deficient in work readiness skills.

WORKSHOP-APPLICATION AND INTERVIEWING – A workshop designed to help job seekers complete applications and be their best at a job interview. Some of the topics include the 7 types of interviews, how to answer illegal questions, what your body language says about you, and how to be your best from interview clothing to asking questions after the interview.  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs. Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP –COMPUTER BASICS – A workshop designed to help new computer users learn the basics from navigating the mouse and keyboard to learning how to get to the internet and perform simple searches.  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-EX-OFFENDERS – A workshop designed to help ex-offenders answer interview and application questions, address barriers to employment, and talk with potential employers about involvement in programs such as Federal Bonding and Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC).  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-FEDERAL AND STATE APPLICATIONS – A workshop designed to help job seekers navigate the Federal and State hiring processes. Topics include tips on filling out those long applications, how to apply for federal and state jobs, Federal resumes, and special hiring processes. Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs. Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-INTRO TO P.C. APPLICATIONS – A workshop designed to help beginning computer users learn about topics such as basic power point presentations from slide shows to animation schemes and how to research on the internet.  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-JOB RETENTION SKILLS – A workshop designed to help a job seeker retain employment. The workshop includes topics such as the 7 reasons you lose a job, bad habits, 11 patterns of failure, and other duties as required. This workshop also discusses hard and soft skills, what they are and why they both matter in the workplace.  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-JOB SEARCHING SKILLS – A workshop designed to help job seekers “plug in” to their job search. The workshop discusses internet job searching, timing out on E-applications, updating resumes, and sending attachments.  Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

WORKSHOP-RESUME AND LETTER CREATION – A workshop designed to make-over your resume and help you create a basic cover letter. The workshop includes topics such as using resume key words to grab an employer’s attention and adjusting the resume format from Chronological to Functional to Targeted depending on where you want an employer to focus their attention. Many workshops are available by request and can be customized for individual needs.  Check with your local Workforce Oklahoma office for times and locations.

YOUTH PROGRAM ELEMENTS / SERVICES – Local youth programs must make the following elements available to youth participants:

  • Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
  • Alternative secondary school services of dropout prevention strategies;
  • Paid and unpaid work experience that have as a component academic and occupational education. This may include summer employment opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, internships,  job shadowing and on the job training opportunities;
  • Occupational skills training;
  • Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
  • Leadership development opportunities;
  • Supportive services;
  • Adult mentoring;
  • Follow-up services for not less than 12 months;
  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling;
  • Financial Literacy Education;
  • Entrepreneurial skills training;
  • Service that provide labor market and employment information;
  • Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education.

Note:  Local programs have the discretion to determine what specific program services will be provided to a youth participant, based on each participant’s objective assessment and individual service strategy. 

YOUTH WHO REQUIRES ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE –   A youth who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program or secure and hold employment is defined by the State as a low income youth meeting one of the following criteria:

  • With a parent or legal guardian that is currently or previously incarcerated for a felony conviction;
  • With a parent or legal guardian who lacks a high school diploma or GED;
  • Who attends or has attended chronically under performing schools listed as a priority or targeted intervention school on the State Department of Education website http://www.ok.gov/sde/priority-schools .
,/g>